What To Write Your Personal Statement On

By: Samantha Baugh Campus Sherpa Blog Contributor, New York University  It seems like every year that writing a “good” personal statement falls under narrower and narrower categories. You aren’t supposed to write about a struggle that is too cliché, you aren’t supposed to write about something too typical, you aren’t supposed to showboat your accomplishments. However on the other side you are somehow supposed to write about your greatest intellectual achievement but make it spiritual and unique without it sounding like a Lifetime movie. The truth is writing your personal statement, a good one, is much easier than it seems. Okay, maybe in retrospect now that I’m in university it seems like that. I think I may have gone through a handful of ideas before I figured out what and more importantly how I was going to write on. The hot tip for a personal statement is simple: write about something you actual care about. If you genuinely care about the impressive non-profit you started, absolutely do it. If you genuinely care about how playing football changed your life, absolutely do it. If you genuinely care about cooking hot dogs on Sundays, absolutely do it. The trick with personal statements …

4 Times in College When You Could Really Use Some Perspective

By: Marisa Borreggine Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, University of Washington When you fail. Everyone. Repeat that word aloud. E V E R Y O N E. Has failed a test, a paper, missed an assignment, taken that blow. Think about your high school valedictorian (and if that’s you, think of the salutatorian). Imagine them sitting in their dorm, looking at the big fat F they just received. I can almost guarantee you that they have been there. Now think about the faith you and your school put in that person—you don’t worry about them. You won’t be surprised when you see them at the high school reunion and they’ve got it all figured out. Guess what? They got an F once, too! And they lived. You will too. Perspective. When you are too tired to go out. There’s this weird feeling throughout college, or at least your freshman year, that every time you go out it’s going to be the best night of your life. Maybe it’s all the pop songs telling us to stay up all night, drink until we’re perfect, live our dreams, but this sentiment stays with me going into my third year of college. I’m not …

The Do’s and Dont’s of New Cities

By: Marisa Borreggine Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, University of Washington If you’ve just begun college, or transferred to a new school from a previous university or community college, you are all too familiar with the confusion and wonder that comes with moving to a new city. The feelings that meet you aren’t exactly the same as they were in your childhood, moving to a new town and immediately making friends just because you were the same age. It takes a bit more effort to make this new town home, and to make those friends all over again. DO: Introduce yourself! Chances are, everyone at the bar/party/event you’re at is just as nervous about meeting people as you are. It does help to have a classic ice breaker (my favorite is asking if someone was in my [insert most interesting class I’ve taken] class, and when they weren’t just talk about that class!), but sometimes just saying “Hi!” is all it takes! Don’t: Introduce yourself to everyone… One of the more unfortunate parts of being in a new town is the idea that not every stranger is trustworthy, even at the local bar. Make sure to be aware of who you’re …

Three Things You’re Bound to Feel as a College Student

By: Marisa Borreggine Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, University of Washington FOMO Even if you’ve never heard the acronym, you’ll definitely know the feeling. It stands for “Fear of Missing Out”. For whatever reason, college seems to be the peak time for this feeling. You come into freshman year excited to make new friends and have ‘the best time of your life’, but ultimately it doesn’t pan out that way. You will have amazing memories and make great friends, but you’ll also have to spend late nights studying, hanging out in your dorm, not going out, etc. These nights are just as important—they’re why you’re at college in the first place! All your friends might be going out to a party, all excited to get dressed up and dance around, but if you have a midterm and know you have to crunch the numbers, it can be really disheartening to stay in while they post pictures of what a great time they had. In all honesty though, you’ll have tons of other nights like they did before you graduate! Sometimes, even they will look at photos of you hiking, partying, going out to dinner and feel FOMO as well. That’s part …

The Job Gradient

By: Marisa Borreggine Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, University of Washington I’m sorry to break the news, but it turns out college isn’t just studying and partying—it’s also reaching out and looking for a job. It’s all fine and well to spend your first few months at school getting your bearings, but soon you will find out that you’re going to need money. Even if your parents have to resources to send you a little something, getting a job is a great idea. It helps you organize your time, learn responsibility, and how to take action. Your parents will be pretty happy about it too! The extra money will help when you have to start paying rent if you move out of the dorms, and supplement your self-care buys, whatever they may be (clothes, chocolate, new sports gear, etc). There’s a process, from my experience, to the college job thing. You might start as early as the summer before college working a small hometown mom-and- pop-shop, which does give you a leg up, but a lot of people don’t get their first job until college, so don’t feel alone if that’s you! The best place to start, in my opinion, is …