Being the Black Sheep

By: Rose Mannas Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, The University of San Francisco Do you notice anything different about me in the picture (far left). Maybe its that I, along with the charming older man in the row in front of me, are not wearing burnt orange. This photo was taken when I was home for Thanksgiving my freshman year. We drove from Dallas, where I am from, to Austin to go to a UT football game. My sister, my mom, and my dad are all Longhorns. Both of my parents graduated in 1990 and my sister is in the Class of 2017. Needless to say, I come from a very proud Longhorn family. But I am not a Longhorn. I always knew knew that I was not going to be a student at UT. I could never see myself on the campus, and the twice-a-month trip to Austin to football and basketball games really took its toll on my interest in the school. I have nothing against UT, but I felt as if I have almost already gone there. I knew all the great hang out spots, all the drama, fraternity and sorority top houses, best tailgate locations, and the …

College Feature: Touring the University of San Francisco

By: Rose Mannas Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, University of San Francisco Do you ever look back at photos of yourself, and think about different things were when you were in the picture? The photo above was taken in May 2013 when I was a mere 17 year old trying to make a college choice. I am pretty sure that shirt ended up in a charity donation bin and those sunglasses fell in the lake years ago. Save that ‘Freshman <3’ photo album on Facebook, no matter how embarrassing the photos inside of it are (don’t worry, you can set it on private if you no long want your aunt seeing you on a very awkward welcome weekend trip). I am from Texas, which is needless to say not close at all at USF. I had only been to San Francisco once in my life. Pretty much all I remembered was getting a dorky hat from In-and- Out (oh so ‘Californian’) and going to Ghirardelli Square. Obviously this was before college was on my mind. When I told my parents I want to check out a school in California, they were obviously surprised. Coming from a hardcore Longhorn family, was I …

Making High-Stakes Low

By: Marisa Borreggine Campus Sherpa Blog Contributor, University of Washington Moving from high school to college can feel like a really big deal. You know more, you feel like you’ve got to work harder on assignments and tests, and it always seems to feel like the big words “YOUR FUTURE” are hanging above everything academic you do in bright neon lights. This amount of stress and pressure can build up and make you feel incapable of doing what you need to do to succeed in your classes. Here I present some ways to make those big deals feel a little bit smaller and more doable. Write it by hand first. When I have a big essay or abstract to write, the one thing that calms me down is writing the whole thing out on paper beforehand. You feel like you’re allowed to make more mistakes, and you can always just scratch out what you don’t like with pen and write over it. You can mess up the paper all you want and think as you go. When you have it all written out, you have to read through it as you type it up and you can fix whatever sounds wrong! …

College Feature: How to Tell If You Can Live at NYU: A Touring Guide

By: Samantha Baugh Campus Sherpa Blog Contributor, NYU  Most college tours are pretty straight-forward, even the self guided ones. You want to check out the dorms, the dining halls, the facilities of your intended area of study. If you have extra time it is always good to look at the main social areas: quad, student center, and library. The same is true for New York University. However, like our unofficial motto says, we are “in and of the city.” To tell if you really like the NYU campus vibe, you have to like the New York City vibe. Of course, no one has time to tour the entire city, let alone just Manhattan. However, the Greenwich Village area is a great place to start. I would suggest looking for restaurants with cheap menus and good food in your area. Also, look out for spots that hold your favorite types of environments I personally spent the majority of my first semester looking for the ideal movie theatre. It is now my favorite place to get away from the non-stop feeling of the city. By the end of the first month you will have a favorite off-campus study spot or relaxation destination. …

College Interview Tips for Success

By: Alexandra Rimoldi  Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, Georgetown University  Perhaps one of the most dreaded parts of the already emotionally draining and time consuming college application process is the interview. With an increasingly competitive pool of applicants, more and more colleges are wanting interviews to further distinguish one from the many in order to create the most perfect, dynamic, and diverse freshman class yet. Still there is no magic piece of information that anyone can give to ensure a student’s admission. However, going to Georgetown (a school where people seem to be obsessed with interviews) and trudging through the college application process has let me into a few tips that cannot hurt to know when going into the interview. Dress smart, but don’t overdo it A college interview isn’t the same as a job interview. It’s a little more casual, but still extremely important. First impressions and the way a person looks (for better or for worse) play a big part in how an interviewer may see you. Stay away from jeans, but a full suit isn’t necessary – you’re still a student. Guys: any nice looking pair of pants that is not jeans should be fine. Wear a button up …

Big Fish, Big Pond

By: Maeve Healy  Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, Georgetown University  Most of us were class presidents in high school. You can walk into a room on campus at any given time and find a handful of former student government leaders, and sitting next to them will be three or four who had a direct hand in influencing some sort of local legislation involving social justice. Half the room is made up of team captains and athletic stars, and then over in the corner you have students that traveled all the way around the world and back in high school. They were all valedictorians, they all have extensive community service backgrounds and they were all the presidents of 6,000 clubs during their senior year. Some have attributed this to the classic mantra “big fish, little pond.” At Georgetown, it is a sea of “big fish.” We all share the same drive for excellence, that’s what brought us here. And it is so easy to get here as a freshman and convince yourself that you are no longer a big fish – you might think you’re a minnow, or maybe one of krill fish in Finding Nemo. It’s so easy to think that now, …