10 Mistakes You Don’t Need to Make Your Freshman Year (as seen on Buzzfeed)

By: Rose Mannas Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, The University of San Francisco Buying Textbooks Before Class Starts I get it. You want to be fully prepared for the first week of classes and not have to dread waiting hours in the bookstore line. I did this too, and dropped almost $300 on books I virtually never using. Don’t kid yourself— if you want it just for ‘reference’, you’re going to Google it before you lug down a textbook from the top of your closet. Adding Everyone on Facebook I know this feels like a good idea, but you need to think about the future. When you and that person make eye contact in the cafeteria, are you going to say something or just smile and look away? They get that odd feeling that you stalked their profile and now… here you are. How creepy is that? Overusing the Class Facebook Page One of my greatest pastimes as an upperclassman is scrolling through those painful posts before freshman year of those seeking to find a roommate. It is almost like reading a bad Craigslist dating ad. Serial commenters say, “Messaged!” and “I love X music, too!!”. Don’t be one of those …

Search for Off-Campus Housing

By: Samantha Baugh Campus Sherpa Blog Contributor, NYU It is not secret that New York City is expensive. That is probably one of the first associations people have with the place. This can make finding your own place difficult. Some people elect to stay in student housing throughout their time at NYU to save money. This is a completely valid option and not uncommon. NYU’s student housing has a variety of options so finding a university apartment space is extremely easy. You won’t be stuck sharking a room forever if you don’t want to. However, many wish to live out of student housing. But, most of these people have to go to another borough of New York to find affordable places. The most common borough is Brooklyn. Brooklyn is fun and very refreshing once you spend a lot of time in Manhattan. It is slightly more spacious and residential compared to Manhattan’s skyscraper style. There will be plenty of other NYU students taking the subway to campus with you from Brooklyn. Students also live in Queens and the Bronx or even across the Hudson in Jersey. What is strange and amazing about the city is how close everything really is, …

A Recruiting Trip Gone Wrong

By: Joseph Luongo Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, Harvard University This is a story of one of my recruiting trips to one of my top schools during the college process and it got a bit awkward, to say the least. To protect the privacy of the school and the people involved, I will use different names. I will refer to the school I was visiting as “Wallace University”. I will also refer to my parents’ colleges as “Windsor College” for my mom, and “Sunnydale” for my dad. These are all fictional colleges from my favorite TV shows and movies (bonus points if you know where they’re from). Since I was getting recruited to play varsity sports at the Division I level, I went through a slightly different application and searching process than someone who is not a college athlete. All sports are different, but essentially college coaches are always on the lookout for early high school talent and standouts. Their recruiting process is nonstop. As soon as they have athletes who are “committed” to their school and confirmed, they already begin finding athletes for the next year. I stood out very early in high school for my sport. Coaches were contacting …

Family Visits

By: Rose Mannas Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, The University of San Francisco One of the most exciting parts about going to school relatively far away is having you family come visit you. It truly does give you something to count down to! My parents come to San Francisco about once an academic year, and my sister has come twice in my three years there (once for a job interview, but still). I really look forward to each time they visit. It doesn’t matter if you are a freshman or a senior- your family come to see you at school is really a treat and a great break from your usual grind. Your parents might be interested in different things than you might think. My parents really wanted to see more of my every day life. What are the dorms like? The communal restrooms? Are the cafeteria lines really long during the school day? What are the classrooms like that you take your lesson in? When my parents came, I was much more focused on showing the city. They of course wanted to see San Francisco, but think of it this way. If you were paying thousands of dollars for someone …

Dorm Tour (VIDEO): Brown University

Contributed by: Alex Volpicello, Brown University As a part of our dorm tour series, we’re compiling videos from our Sherpas at schools across the nation! Here’s what your dorm at Brown University could look like: Dorm Life at Brown: There is a mandatory housing requirement at Brown for your first two years, after which you are eligible to apply for off-campus permissions, but only actually likely to have them granted your senior year. Freshmen housing at Brown is almost exclusively doubles, but there are some singles and the occasional triple. You do fill out a housing questionnaire to get paired with a roommate, in which you can opt into a gender-neutral dorm room, single-sex (male or female) floors, substance-free floors, and quiet floors. Roommate pairings also consider smoking habits, studying habits, noise habits, and sleeping habits, in addition to avoiding pairing based on same first name or same home state (if USA). Campus Sherpa is starting a dorm tour series so that you can see what it would actually be like to live at different schools. Our Sherpas are sharing videos of what their dorm rooms, apartments, or houses look like. You can check out more on our Youtube Channel. 

Entering College in a Long Distance Relationship: Dos and Don’ts

By: Joe Urbano Campus Sherpa Blog Contributor, RIT In my last post, we discussed one of the many factors in choosing the best school for you: relationships. In this post, we’re moving past the decision making process and moving into the nitty-gritty. A decision has been made, and now the two of you are going to live with it: the transition to a long distance relationship. The above paragraph makes the prospect of entering a long distance relationship sound really gloomy, but in reality, it isn’t. By no means is it an easy decision or an easy lifestyle, but it isn’t the end of the world, I promise. You’re now off to school for the first time, and there are some things you should do, and there are some that you shouldn’t. Here are a few tips to make both your college experience and your relationship the best they can be as you begin the next part of your life: Don’t: Over Communicate. You and your partner are going to talk, text, and use Snapchat. This is obviously expected and it is good! But you shouldn’t let the familiar comfort of your partner stop you from doing other things or …

The School Spirit Starter Pack: College Apparel and Accessories You MUST Buy

By: Alex Cole Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, William and Mary University Once November rolls around, relatives and family friends all inevitably begin asking the same question: what do you want for Christmas/Hanukkah/other winter holidays? Luckily, for those who get in early decision or early action, or just have a good feeling that you’re going to be accepted by your dream school, the holidays are the perfect time to start amassing college apparel. But what items will you actually use? Here, I’ve outlined the spirit paraphernalia every college student needs. If you haven’t decided on a school yet, be sure to save this list to guide you on a celebratory shopping spree when your final decision is reached. A Baseball Cap Baseball caps are perfect for throwing on for your Friday morning 8 am class once you get to school; before then, though, a baseball cap is a great way to casually rep your school while running errands, going for hikes, or sightseeing on summer trips. Bonus points for picking out a classy embroidered hat that features the school crest! Tervis tumbler or water bottle If you’re a coffee drinker, a Tervis Tumblers are a great invest because they can be …

Featured Post: Tips for College Essays by Admitsee

It’s easy to be intimidated by college acceptance rates these days, especially with Ivy League universities like Brown. So how exactly do you stand out to admission officers for a chance to be one of the lucky 9%? AdmitSee has a database of successful college application files. Each files not only includes essays, but also background, test scores, extracurriculars and advice. If you are applying to Brown, here are 5 essay excerpts to help you with your essay: Elle2020, Class of 2020 “Are you a member of the Amish Mafia?” A classmate once asked after I told her I was Mennonite. “Do you not use electricity?” Another student quickly speculated. “No,” I sighed.   In this instance, as is commonplace, my disclosure was met with looks of puzzlement, and then a response along the lines of, “but you don’t seem like the rest of them.”   Throughout my life, I have heard the whole gamut of possible retorts to the statement of my religion. ACal212, Class of 2019 I have a complex Oedipus complex: it’s quite difficult (impossible, really) to develop and then resolve a rivalry with my father if he does not exist. So, according to Freud, I’ll never …

Going to School 1,730 Miles From Home

By: Rose Mannas Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, The University of San Francisco I think that most people who end up going to school far away fall into two separate camps: escape from their parents or coincidental. I fall into the second category, and you might, too. But if you are looking to escape your parents, going to school over 1,700 miles isn’t a bad option. Let me show you some of my thoughts right off of my pros and cons list: Pros: •Being stranded can kind of be a fun experience. •Some people think you have an accent which you swear you do not. •If you know you want to live in your hometown when you get a real job, why not try something different for once. •If your parents are financially supporting you, it may be fun to try somewhere completely out of your bubble. •Your experience is so unique to your friends that you always have lots to talk and laugh about. •You are forever entertained by the strange things you find different in the place you go to school at (did you know my Californian friends don’t have Waffle House?). Cons: • Travel is expensive- you may …

Stressing out about College Applications? Read This Now

By: Aishwarya Sadh Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, American University The due dates are approaching but you still don’t know what you’re going to study or where you want to go? Even if you are set on your potential school, still keep your options open. Here are some of the questions to help narrow down your options or at least alleviate some anxieties: A. What do you want to study? If you know what you want to potentially major in then awesome. Check to see which one of your schools has the best program for that field or major or has the major available. But what if I don’t know my major? It’s completely ok!! Take out a notebook. List your favorite classes in high school. List some topics that you’re interested in. These lists should give you a glimpse of potential fields or majors you would be interested in. Then look to see if your top schools have those majors available. Keep in mind that most state colleges would have array of majors. B. Where do you want to study? City/large school: Pro: fun activities available regularly, tons of people Con: too loud, too many people, lack of personal space Small …

Dorm Communal Bathrooms

By: Rose Mannas Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, University of San Francisco  I know what you are thinking: Communal restrooms in my dorm are going to be utterly repulsive, but I just have to survive one year and never have to deal with gross bathrooms again. Though this could be true for some, everyone has a different experience when it comes to having communal bathrooms. Let’s talk about the good and the bad: The Good  You never have to front money for toilet paper and cleaning products for the restroom. Budgeting in another $10 in cleaning supplies could pose a threat to your bagel commerce in the near future. Always available! Usually, dorm restrooms have many toilets and showers to be used by your floor mates. Never have I ever needed to wait to use the toilet, shower, or sink. It can be fun! It is a huge space to get ready for events with your floor friends. The counters span the entire space, perfect for spreading out makeup and hair tools. It a basically a giant pre-party for big on-campus events like concerts and mixers. The Bad Cleanliness. We all have different standards. For a clean freak like me, seeing …

College Feature: William and Mary’s Newest Program of Study – Native Studies Minor

By: Alex Cole Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, College of William and Mary The recent debate over the potential Dakota Access Pipeline and its relation to the Standing Rock Indian Reservation, the marginalization of Native Americans has gained increased attention. The escalating situation has made the College of William & Mary’s newest program of study even more timely; as of the Spring 2017 semester, William and Mary will offer a minor in Native Studies which can be pursued in conjunction with any major at the College. Founded in 1693, William and Mary has a long and sometimes turbulent history of relations with Natives. Most notably, the Indian School operated at the College operated from the year of the school’s founding until the funding ran out at the onset of the American revolution. The school occupied the Brafferton building on Ancient Campus, which still exists today, and required Native boys to live at the College where they received lessons in Christianity amongst other subjects. Although some Natives went on to use their knowledge of English to protect their tribes from British manipulation, other boys attended the school against their will and many died from exposure to European disease. Today, the Native Studies …