Dorm Tour: The University of San Francisco

Contributed by: Rose Mannas Curious what it’s like to live at Stanford? Check out this video for a brief tour of a real Stanford dorm brought to you by a current undergraduate student! Dorm Life at USF: All freshmen must live on campus unless they are within a certain milage of campus. With housing is the mandatory purchase of a meal plan (one meal plan, expect athletes can get a bigger one). There are dorms on campus: Hayes Healy: Alternating sex floor. Single, double, and triple rooms. Also living learning communities Gilson: Same as Hayes Phelan: Mixed sex floors, gender inclusive floor (can have opposite sex roommates), and living-learning communities Fromm: All girls Lone Mountain: Same as Hayes Loyola Village: 21+ housing or junior class standing only, apartment style living Interested in more? Check out Campus Sherpa’s Youtube channel for more dorm videos of various universities throughout the country! 

Dorm Tour: Columbia University

Contributed by: Sairaj Sajjath Curious what it’s like to live at Stanford? Check out this video for a brief tour of a real Stanford dorm brought to you by a current undergraduate student! Dorm Life at Columbia: On-campus housing is not mandatory except for first-years, although it is preferred for many students due to proximity to campus compared to apartments. First-years commuting from parents’/guardians’; residences are not required to take on-campus housing. Most floors are coed, although there are single-sex floors available for first years. I have not heard of/cannot find anything about single-sex floors for other years. Students can choose to live in doubles, singles, or in suites, although larger suites are generally reserved for upperclassmen. Some Greek organizations/other special organizations are given brownstones by Columbia; students in these organizations can also choose to live in their brownstone. Housing is guaranteed to all students for up to four years – however, students are not guaranteed their residence of choice. Dorms are assigned on a lottery system (students are assigned a number; those with lower numbers choose residences earlier than students with higher numbers). Interested in more? Check out Campus Sherpa’s Youtube channel for more dorm videos of various universities throughout the country! 

Not Home for the Holidays

By: Rose Mannas Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, The University of San Francisco All families have holiday traditions that they just can’t see themselves missing, whatever their culture is. For my family, one of these things include pulling all of the Christmas decorations down from the attic. We play Christmas music throughout the house and take a few hours working all together to transform the house into Christmas-mode. But when I got home from my Fall semester my Freshman year, the house was already transformed, and I was left to just enjoy the tradition without participating. You will find that once you leave for college, you are going to miss key happenings in your family that you hate to see go on without your presence. Unfortunately, it is inevitable and includes things that you did not even know you cared about. If your family cannot afford to get you home on every holiday, it can be so painful to sit at school, sometimes alone. Where I go to school, the majority of students are from the Bay Area, making it so easy for them to get a ride home or pay $10 to use public transportation to get to their home …

Cheap(er) Theater in NYC

By: Samantha Baugh Campus Sherpa Blog Contributor, New York University If you are like me, you love going to see shows. Now, Broadway is probably your first thought but it can often be very difficult to find affordable seats to go see a show. If you are on a tighter budget, there are plenty of other exciting and affordable opportunities to see innovative and professional theatre. Location wise, East Village is a great place to look. The Kraine Theatre hosts play festivals throughout the year. They also have regular companies use their space. For example, New York Neo-Futurists hold a weekly show that is only ten dollars. The New York Theatre Wing is more expensive but they turn out a lot of incredible shows that sometimes even make the jump to Broadway. You have the chance to see some future Tony Award winning shows/actors/writers before they make their jump. The key is to keep an eye out for pop up productions around the cities. Often enough, a show will rent out spaces, sometimes even homes, to perform their work. I once went to an immersive production where I walked around the home as a play was going on. Comedy shows …

Dorm Tour: Stanford University

Contributed by: Alexandra Bourdillon Curious what it’s like to live at Stanford? Check out this video for a brief tour of a real Stanford dorm brought to you by a current undergraduate student! Dorm Life at Stanford:  Housing is mandatory for freshman, but pretty normal for students to live on campus all 4 years because it is quite affordable compared to neighboring areas. There are a number of Greek and non-Greek “Row” Houses which are popular because of the strong sense of community, well-received dining options (each house has a special chef!) and location to all campus parties. These are popular for upperclassmen housing. Some (few) dorms have single sex floors. Single sex dorms are usually Greek related, but there is one exception – a smaller female-only Row House. Freshman year, housing is randomly assigned or based off of input from the “Draw form.” The other 3 years require a lottery draw system that allows students to form draw groups with close friends and rank housing. Stanford uses a tier system so that each year you are allowed to use your “Tier 1, 2 or 3” (Tier 1 being the best!). Interested in more? Check out Campus Sherpa’s Youtube channel for more …

One for One

By: Joseph Luongo Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, Harvard University My college admissions and acceptance process was pretty unique than many other students. I looked at a lot of what people would call “Elite” schools throughout my college touring process. This included the Ivy League, Stanford, Duke, MIT, Georgetown, and so on and so forth. Now this may be a little biased since I’m from Massachusetts, but the second I stepped onto Harvard’s campus it felt like home and I knew that’s where I wanted to be for a number of reasons, but that’s another story. I liked a lot of schools, narrowing my top five down to Harvard, Duke, Dartmouth, Brown, and Princeton, in that order. But Harvard was my number one by far and I wanted to attend there more than anything. I decided to apply for Restrictive Early Action at Harvard which means you can only apply early to Harvard for a private school, but are allowed to apply to public schools as well. Since I’m from Massachusetts, this meant that I was able to apply to any of the University of Massachusetts schools or any other state schools as well. I started my application over the summer …

Co-Op Schools

By: Joseph Urbano Campus Sherpa Blog Contributor, RIT Some schools are known for their architecture. Others are known for their academic rigor. Athletics are at the heart of others. I go to the Rochester Institute of Technology, or RIT, which is best known for its co-op program. Co-op schools include Northeastern, RIT, and Drexel, but certainly aren’t limited to those. Even if a university isn’t a “co-op university,” co-op is something you could pursue. So let’s talk about it. As a student at RIT, I am quite familiar with how we go about our co-op program, but not so much about every other school. so you should still do your research! You shouldn’t assume all the details are going to be the same from school to school. Every school is different. What is a co-op, anyway? Co-op stands for cooperative education, or, in other words, a paid internship. RIT requires all students in the College of Engineering and most students (depending on major) in the College of Computing and Information Sciences to spend 50 weeks of full time (40+ hour/week) employment in order to obtain a Bachelor’s degree, broken up into 3 blocks. Depending on the major, schedules may be …