Far Friends

By: Rose Mannas Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, University of San Francisco If you want to feel better about going to school far away, let me make you feel better: All of my high school friends attend schools within 5 hours of home, and I am the only person who chose to attend a school more than 26 hours away. There are so many hard things about leaving your high school friends and paving the way for yourself at a school where you know nobody. I want to make this post tell you that you CAN do it. Let’s talk about the hard stuff first: • During the first few weeks of freshman year, people who go to school with high school friends will cling to each other. It may rip you apart to see your high school friends still hang out with each other during college when you are so far away and don’t have that safety. • They can go home much more easily. I have missed so many family events due to the high costs of going home and the great lengths it takes to get there. Friends who go to school with each other can carpool and make those weekend trips home …

On Choosing the Right School for You For the Right Reasons

By: Joe Urbano Campus Sherpa Blog Contributor, Rochester Institute of Technology For some people, part of the so-called “college experience” is the culture of drinking, partying, and hooking up. That’s certainly not a problem, but just because others partake doesn’t mean that you have to when you get to school. Part of what makes college such an amazing experience is the ability to experiment with different social environments and lifestyles to find out what’s right for you. But say you’re already in a relationship. Are you missing out on part of that? Are you missing out on part of college?‘ Well, in short, maybe. As anyone would say, there’s very little black and white when it comes to relationships, so I can’t just outright say ‘yes’ or ‘no.’ But I can guide provide a few pointers and examples to perhaps give some more perspectives to consider, and today we’ll address the first of many points I want to cover: You shouldn’t pick a school for your partner. There are a TON of factors in picking the right school – programs of study, financial aid, friends, proximity to home, and the like. This is something that is brutally difficult for some …

Upperclassmen Life at Harvard

By: Joseph Luongo Campus Sherpa Blog Contributor, Harvard University In my previous blog, I wrote about freshman life at Harvard. I would like to continue that storyline with talking about upperclassmen life. As previously mentioned, all freshmen are required to live in Harvard Yard with randomly assigned roommates. The next three years are very different. Although students are not required to live on campus for the next three years, 98% choose to do so. Finding out your living arrangement after freshman year is actually a very long and exciting process at Harvard. Much like other facets of Harvard, housing is much like Harry Potter. Students are randomly sorted into one of the twelve upperclassmen houses located throughout the University (minus the sorting hat). The first step to this process is setting up a “blocking group”. This is a group of one to eight students of their choosing who will all be guaranteed to be placed in the same house with each other. This can include anyone within your graduating year of any gender; Harvard has gender neutral housing, even within actual rooms. Most of the time, students choose to live with people in their blocking group, but depending on which …