Upperclassmen Life at Harvard

By: Joseph Luongo Campus Sherpa Blog Contributor, Harvard University In my previous blog, I wrote about freshman life at Harvard. I would like to continue that storyline with talking about upperclassmen life. As previously mentioned, all freshmen are required to live in Harvard Yard with randomly assigned roommates. The next three years are very different. Although students are not required to live on campus for the next three years, 98% choose to do so. Finding out your living arrangement after freshman year is actually a very long and exciting process at Harvard. Much like other facets of Harvard, housing is much like Harry Potter. Students are randomly sorted into one of the twelve upperclassmen houses located throughout the University (minus the sorting hat). The first step to this process is setting up a “blocking group”. This is a group of one to eight students of their choosing who will all be guaranteed to be placed in the same house with each other. This can include anyone within your graduating year of any gender; Harvard has gender neutral housing, even within actual rooms. Most of the time, students choose to live with people in their blocking group, but depending on which …

Freshman Life at Harvard

By: Joseph Luongo Campus Sherpa Blog Contributor, Harvard University At Harvard, housing is very different and unique. Almost everyone lives on campus, approximately 97% all four years, and that is due to our housing system. As a freshman, students are required to live on campus. Over the summer, students fill out a housing questionnaire, more like a test, so Harvard can pair students with roommates that won’t be at each other’s throats. Housing is completely random freshman year, students do not get to request or choose whom they live with. They ask you questions such as: Are you neat? What time do you go to bed? Do you like a quiet room?, and so on and so forth. Then they send the students’ parents the same questionnaire and ask: Are they really neat? What time do they actually go to bed? How loud are they actually? They take forever to sort roommates and dorms because everyone is hand selected by Harvard for each other, which is why Harvard tries to get a very accurate description of students. At Harvard, all dorms are co-ed and all have different things about them such as room size, bathrooms, configuration, number of roommates, study …

College Professors are Different

By: Rose Mannas Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, USF Forget what you know about teachers from what you experienced in high school. In fact, forget that you even called them ‘teachers’ because now you only call them ‘professors’. These men and women are powerful forces of nature that are hardly held down by policy, political correctness, or even lesson plans. I have had some of the wildest professors. They have stopped class to be taught how to do the Hotline Bling by Drake, to Snapchat (see photo attached), and even hold hands and sing a song in a language nobody spoke just because it was ‘stuck in his head’. They cuss, they make politically charged statements, they throw people out of class, and they don’t care what you think of them. College professors are their own breed of people and they are the people on campus you love and hate the most. If there is one thing you need to consider most important, it is this: Make sure your professor knows who you are, knows you are serious, and continues to know who you are after you finish their class. Networking is one thing you just cannot learn the importance of …

Dorm Tour: Stanford University

Contributed by: Alexandra Bourdillon Curious what it’s like to live at Stanford? Check out this video for a brief tour of a real Stanford dorm brought to you by a current undergraduate student! Dorm Life at Stanford:  Housing is mandatory for freshman, but pretty normal for students to live on campus all 4 years because it is quite affordable compared to neighboring areas. There are a number of Greek and non-Greek “Row” Houses which are popular because of the strong sense of community, well-received dining options (each house has a special chef!) and location to all campus parties. These are popular for upperclassmen housing. Some (few) dorms have single sex floors. Single sex dorms are usually Greek related, but there is one exception – a smaller female-only Row House. Freshman year, housing is randomly assigned or based off of input from the “Draw form.” The other 3 years require a lottery draw system that allows students to form draw groups with close friends and rank housing. Stanford uses a tier system so that each year you are allowed to use your “Tier 1, 2 or 3” (Tier 1 being the best!). Interested in more? Check out Campus Sherpa’s Youtube channel for more …

Dorm Communal Bathrooms

By: Rose Mannas Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, University of San Francisco  I know what you are thinking: Communal restrooms in my dorm are going to be utterly repulsive, but I just have to survive one year and never have to deal with gross bathrooms again. Though this could be true for some, everyone has a different experience when it comes to having communal bathrooms. Let’s talk about the good and the bad: The Good  You never have to front money for toilet paper and cleaning products for the restroom. Budgeting in another $10 in cleaning supplies could pose a threat to your bagel commerce in the near future. Always available! Usually, dorm restrooms have many toilets and showers to be used by your floor mates. Never have I ever needed to wait to use the toilet, shower, or sink. It can be fun! It is a huge space to get ready for events with your floor friends. The counters span the entire space, perfect for spreading out makeup and hair tools. It a basically a giant pre-party for big on-campus events like concerts and mixers. The Bad Cleanliness. We all have different standards. For a clean freak like me, seeing …

Three Things You’re Bound to Feel as a College Student

By: Marisa Borreggine Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, University of Washington FOMO Even if you’ve never heard the acronym, you’ll definitely know the feeling. It stands for “Fear of Missing Out”. For whatever reason, college seems to be the peak time for this feeling. You come into freshman year excited to make new friends and have ‘the best time of your life’, but ultimately it doesn’t pan out that way. You will have amazing memories and make great friends, but you’ll also have to spend late nights studying, hanging out in your dorm, not going out, etc. These nights are just as important—they’re why you’re at college in the first place! All your friends might be going out to a party, all excited to get dressed up and dance around, but if you have a midterm and know you have to crunch the numbers, it can be really disheartening to stay in while they post pictures of what a great time they had. In all honesty though, you’ll have tons of other nights like they did before you graduate! Sometimes, even they will look at photos of you hiking, partying, going out to dinner and feel FOMO as well. That’s part …

Thoughts on Party Alternatives

By: Marisa Borreggine Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, University of Washington If you’re anything like me, sometimes you need a break from going out and partying every weekend. Not necessarily because you need more time to do homework, because let’s face it: we all need a break come Friday night. I’m raising the question, who’s to say that just because we’re in college that break has to be getting all dressed up, taking an uber ten blocks, and standing in a stranger’s home for three hours with a bunch of strangers who don’t want to introduce themselves? Who’s to say you have to wake up feeling like someone punched you in the head every Saturday? Who’s to say that is the best way to spend your free time? Not I. Here I’ll present some of my favorite alternatives to partying on the weekend that I hope you and your friends will give a chance. Climbing Depending on where you live, there could be some really cool climbing gyms teeming with fun open late on the weekend! It’s a great way to relieve some stress after a long school week, and afterwards you can go out to dinner with Seattle Bouldering Project …

On the woes of Freshman Year: Choosing Classes

By: Sherpa Marisa Borreggine Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, University of Washington  If there is one feeling I remember going into my freshman year of college, it is confusion. It’s one of those rites of passage that you don’t even get a pat on the back for, or really any reward for, but you still feel like you’re being hazed as you try to navigate every new set of responsibilities thrown upon you. What’s the day-to-day like of living in a dorm? How do I eat? What’s the meal plan going to be like? How do I pay for anything? And, of course, the reason you’re even going through all of this trouble—what are my classes going to be like? Since it’s 2016 and the internet is a thing, most every school you go to will have an online course catalog available. Now, here is where you decide if this is going to be stressful, fun, or a little bit of both. I personally strive under fun stress, so Step One for me was to find the college I’d most likely end up in. I don’t mean your university, I mean the college within your school, such as College of Arts …

Our Campus Secrets: The Faculty Club at University of California, Berkeley

By Sherpa Diana Lutfi Blog Contributor, University of California, Berkeley  My favorite campus secret is to go to the Faculty Club to read a book when it’s beautiful outdoors or when it’s raining. It’s an interesting place to meet people and to get some great ambiance and even a little study time. But shhh.. this is my secret go-to spot to snag a book.