The School Spirit Starter Pack: College Apparel and Accessories You MUST Buy

By: Alex Cole Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, William and Mary University Once November rolls around, relatives and family friends all inevitably begin asking the same question: what do you want for Christmas/Hanukkah/other winter holidays? Luckily, for those who get in early decision or early action, or just have a good feeling that you’re going to be accepted by your dream school, the holidays are the perfect time to start amassing college apparel. But what items will you actually use? Here, I’ve outlined the spirit paraphernalia every college student needs. If you haven’t decided on a school yet, be sure to save this list to guide you on a celebratory shopping spree when your final decision is reached. A Baseball Cap Baseball caps are perfect for throwing on for your Friday morning 8 am class once you get to school; before then, though, a baseball cap is a great way to casually rep your school while running errands, going for hikes, or sightseeing on summer trips. Bonus points for picking out a classy embroidered hat that features the school crest! Tervis tumbler or water bottle If you’re a coffee drinker, a Tervis Tumblers are a great invest because they can be …

College Feature: William and Mary’s Newest Program of Study – Native Studies Minor

By: Alex Cole Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, College of William and Mary The recent debate over the potential Dakota Access Pipeline and its relation to the Standing Rock Indian Reservation, the marginalization of Native Americans has gained increased attention. The escalating situation has made the College of William & Mary’s newest program of study even more timely; as of the Spring 2017 semester, William and Mary will offer a minor in Native Studies which can be pursued in conjunction with any major at the College. Founded in 1693, William and Mary has a long and sometimes turbulent history of relations with Natives. Most notably, the Indian School operated at the College operated from the year of the school’s founding until the funding ran out at the onset of the American revolution. The school occupied the Brafferton building on Ancient Campus, which still exists today, and required Native boys to live at the College where they received lessons in Christianity amongst other subjects. Although some Natives went on to use their knowledge of English to protect their tribes from British manipulation, other boys attended the school against their will and many died from exposure to European disease. Today, the Native Studies …

Making High-Stakes Low

By: Marisa Borreggine Campus Sherpa Blog Contributor, University of Washington Moving from high school to college can feel like a really big deal. You know more, you feel like you’ve got to work harder on assignments and tests, and it always seems to feel like the big words “YOUR FUTURE” are hanging above everything academic you do in bright neon lights. This amount of stress and pressure can build up and make you feel incapable of doing what you need to do to succeed in your classes. Here I present some ways to make those big deals feel a little bit smaller and more doable. Write it by hand first. When I have a big essay or abstract to write, the one thing that calms me down is writing the whole thing out on paper beforehand. You feel like you’re allowed to make more mistakes, and you can always just scratch out what you don’t like with pen and write over it. You can mess up the paper all you want and think as you go. When you have it all written out, you have to read through it as you type it up and you can fix whatever sounds wrong! …

College Interview Tips for Success

By: Alexandra Rimoldi  Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, Georgetown University  Perhaps one of the most dreaded parts of the already emotionally draining and time consuming college application process is the interview. With an increasingly competitive pool of applicants, more and more colleges are wanting interviews to further distinguish one from the many in order to create the most perfect, dynamic, and diverse freshman class yet. Still there is no magic piece of information that anyone can give to ensure a student’s admission. However, going to Georgetown (a school where people seem to be obsessed with interviews) and trudging through the college application process has let me into a few tips that cannot hurt to know when going into the interview. Dress smart, but don’t overdo it A college interview isn’t the same as a job interview. It’s a little more casual, but still extremely important. First impressions and the way a person looks (for better or for worse) play a big part in how an interviewer may see you. Stay away from jeans, but a full suit isn’t necessary – you’re still a student. Guys: any nice looking pair of pants that is not jeans should be fine. Wear a button up …

What To Write Your Personal Statement On

By: Samantha Baugh Campus Sherpa Blog Contributor, New York University  It seems like every year that writing a “good” personal statement falls under narrower and narrower categories. You aren’t supposed to write about a struggle that is too cliché, you aren’t supposed to write about something too typical, you aren’t supposed to showboat your accomplishments. However on the other side you are somehow supposed to write about your greatest intellectual achievement but make it spiritual and unique without it sounding like a Lifetime movie. The truth is writing your personal statement, a good one, is much easier than it seems. Okay, maybe in retrospect now that I’m in university it seems like that. I think I may have gone through a handful of ideas before I figured out what and more importantly how I was going to write on. The hot tip for a personal statement is simple: write about something you actual care about. If you genuinely care about the impressive non-profit you started, absolutely do it. If you genuinely care about how playing football changed your life, absolutely do it. If you genuinely care about cooking hot dogs on Sundays, absolutely do it. The trick with personal statements …

The Job Gradient

By: Marisa Borreggine Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, University of Washington I’m sorry to break the news, but it turns out college isn’t just studying and partying—it’s also reaching out and looking for a job. It’s all fine and well to spend your first few months at school getting your bearings, but soon you will find out that you’re going to need money. Even if your parents have to resources to send you a little something, getting a job is a great idea. It helps you organize your time, learn responsibility, and how to take action. Your parents will be pretty happy about it too! The extra money will help when you have to start paying rent if you move out of the dorms, and supplement your self-care buys, whatever they may be (clothes, chocolate, new sports gear, etc). There’s a process, from my experience, to the college job thing. You might start as early as the summer before college working a small hometown mom-and- pop-shop, which does give you a leg up, but a lot of people don’t get their first job until college, so don’t feel alone if that’s you! The best place to start, in my opinion, is …

The 10 Do’s And Don’ts Of The Post College Acceptance Phase (as seen on Buzzfeed)

By: Sherpa Marisa Borreggine Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, University of Washington 1. DO: Celebrate! MTV / Via mtv.tumblr.com Post all those pictures of your campus, of you and your mom crying over your acceptance letter, of your massive collection of college sweatshirts. You’ve earned it! 2. DON’T: Ask your peers for the list of places they did and didn’t get into. Giphy / Via giphy.com As you probably know, this is a stressful time for everyone! Sometimes your friends don’t get into their dream school, and that’s the last thing they want to talk about. Keep it light and congratulate everyone on wherever they decide to go! 3. DO: Get A Summer Job! Girls on HBO / Via giphy.com Oh, trust me, you’re gonna need the extra cash. College is the time for late-night Thai food, clothes for the weather you didn’t expect (yeah, I’m talking about you Michigan), and little odds and ends like dorm decorations, books, concerts. Do yourself a favor! 4. DON’T: Give in to “Senioritis.” Yeah, your dreams have been achieved, all you’ve been working for has paid off, but at the risk of sounding like your parents: Keep going! You can get that acceptance taken …

What’s something people don’t know about your school? – Harvard University

“Every year in the spring, there is a day called Housing Day, which is essentially a school wide holiday. On this day, freshman are delivered their housing assignment (which of the 12 upperclassmen houses they will live in for the next three years). Upperclassmen from your house rush into your room to hand you the letter and celebrate your assignment. Then, you get oriented to your new house and community during the rest of the day and at night!” – Sherpa Josh, Harvard University