Time Management: Adjusting to the Free Time in A College Schedule

    Written by Sherpa Jackie G. In high school, you typically are in class from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Even if you have a study hall period, you are required to stay in a certain area of campus or be back within an hour or so. College does away with this standard schedule all together. Classes are held sometimes as late at 7 p.m., or you may have an 8 a.m. class and not another until 4 p.m. What you do during that time is not dictated by anyone but yourself. How you choose to spend that time can have a great influence on your grades, social life, and overall health. Do you spend that time at the gym? Getting ahead on assignments? Fooling around on YouTube for hours? I remember my first day of college classes, or I should really say class. Monday rolled around and I had one lecture from 1 to 1:50 p.m. and the rest of the day to spend however I wanted. While many students at UC Santa Barbara succumb to hours on the beach playing Frisbee, tanning, or surfing, I tried to incorporate a balance of work and play. I may spend …

Harvard Housing Memories: Kirkland House

By: Joe Luongo, Harvard University Campus Sherpa Blog Contributor As I mentioned, Harvard has twelve upperclassmen houses that students live in their last three years at Harvard. A building that holds a special meaning to me is my house, Kirkland House. In Kirkland House, I had three very special experiences that makes me feel that Kirkland is especially unique. Earlier in the year, Hillary Clinton visited Harvard, in particular the Kirkland House Junior Common Room, for a small talk and interview completely unannounced and without press. I was lucky enough to meet and speak with her which still has me in disbelief. Out of all the universities in the world, and all the places and Houses at Harvard, Hillary visited Kirkland. The second experience, which happened rather recently, involved a certain billionaire, who founded a certain social media platform who just so happened to visit Kirkland as well. Mark Zuckerberg, inventor of Facebook, was a student in Kirkland Room H-33 before he dropped out to develop and expand his creation. Two of my roommates got assigned H-33 for housing this summer, and lucky for me, I decided to visit them on the same day and exact time that Mark came …

Far Friends

By: Rose Mannas Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, University of San Francisco If you want to feel better about going to school far away, let me make you feel better: All of my high school friends attend schools within 5 hours of home, and I am the only person who chose to attend a school more than 26 hours away. There are so many hard things about leaving your high school friends and paving the way for yourself at a school where you know nobody. I want to make this post tell you that you CAN do it. Let’s talk about the hard stuff first: • During the first few weeks of freshman year, people who go to school with high school friends will cling to each other. It may rip you apart to see your high school friends still hang out with each other during college when you are so far away and don’t have that safety. • They can go home much more easily. I have missed so many family events due to the high costs of going home and the great lengths it takes to get there. Friends who go to school with each other can carpool and make those weekend trips home …

Not Home for the Holidays

By: Rose Mannas Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, The University of San Francisco All families have holiday traditions that they just can’t see themselves missing, whatever their culture is. For my family, one of these things include pulling all of the Christmas decorations down from the attic. We play Christmas music throughout the house and take a few hours working all together to transform the house into Christmas-mode. But when I got home from my Fall semester my Freshman year, the house was already transformed, and I was left to just enjoy the tradition without participating. You will find that once you leave for college, you are going to miss key happenings in your family that you hate to see go on without your presence. Unfortunately, it is inevitable and includes things that you did not even know you cared about. If your family cannot afford to get you home on every holiday, it can be so painful to sit at school, sometimes alone. Where I go to school, the majority of students are from the Bay Area, making it so easy for them to get a ride home or pay $10 to use public transportation to get to their home …

One for One

By: Joseph Luongo Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, Harvard University My college admissions and acceptance process was pretty unique than many other students. I looked at a lot of what people would call “Elite” schools throughout my college touring process. This included the Ivy League, Stanford, Duke, MIT, Georgetown, and so on and so forth. Now this may be a little biased since I’m from Massachusetts, but the second I stepped onto Harvard’s campus it felt like home and I knew that’s where I wanted to be for a number of reasons, but that’s another story. I liked a lot of schools, narrowing my top five down to Harvard, Duke, Dartmouth, Brown, and Princeton, in that order. But Harvard was my number one by far and I wanted to attend there more than anything. I decided to apply for Restrictive Early Action at Harvard which means you can only apply early to Harvard for a private school, but are allowed to apply to public schools as well. Since I’m from Massachusetts, this meant that I was able to apply to any of the University of Massachusetts schools or any other state schools as well. I started my application over the summer …

10 Mistakes You Don’t Need to Make Your Freshman Year (as seen on Buzzfeed)

By: Rose Mannas Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, The University of San Francisco Buying Textbooks Before Class Starts I get it. You want to be fully prepared for the first week of classes and not have to dread waiting hours in the bookstore line. I did this too, and dropped almost $300 on books I virtually never using. Don’t kid yourself— if you want it just for ‘reference’, you’re going to Google it before you lug down a textbook from the top of your closet. Adding Everyone on Facebook I know this feels like a good idea, but you need to think about the future. When you and that person make eye contact in the cafeteria, are you going to say something or just smile and look away? They get that odd feeling that you stalked their profile and now… here you are. How creepy is that? Overusing the Class Facebook Page One of my greatest pastimes as an upperclassman is scrolling through those painful posts before freshman year of those seeking to find a roommate. It is almost like reading a bad Craigslist dating ad. Serial commenters say, “Messaged!” and “I love X music, too!!”. Don’t be one of those …

Family Visits

By: Rose Mannas Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, The University of San Francisco One of the most exciting parts about going to school relatively far away is having you family come visit you. It truly does give you something to count down to! My parents come to San Francisco about once an academic year, and my sister has come twice in my three years there (once for a job interview, but still). I really look forward to each time they visit. It doesn’t matter if you are a freshman or a senior- your family come to see you at school is really a treat and a great break from your usual grind. Your parents might be interested in different things than you might think. My parents really wanted to see more of my every day life. What are the dorms like? The communal restrooms? Are the cafeteria lines really long during the school day? What are the classrooms like that you take your lesson in? When my parents came, I was much more focused on showing the city. They of course wanted to see San Francisco, but think of it this way. If you were paying thousands of dollars for someone …

Entering College in a Long Distance Relationship: Dos and Don’ts

By: Joe Urbano Campus Sherpa Blog Contributor, RIT In my last post, we discussed one of the many factors in choosing the best school for you: relationships. In this post, we’re moving past the decision making process and moving into the nitty-gritty. A decision has been made, and now the two of you are going to live with it: the transition to a long distance relationship. The above paragraph makes the prospect of entering a long distance relationship sound really gloomy, but in reality, it isn’t. By no means is it an easy decision or an easy lifestyle, but it isn’t the end of the world, I promise. You’re now off to school for the first time, and there are some things you should do, and there are some that you shouldn’t. Here are a few tips to make both your college experience and your relationship the best they can be as you begin the next part of your life: Don’t: Over Communicate. You and your partner are going to talk, text, and use Snapchat. This is obviously expected and it is good! But you shouldn’t let the familiar comfort of your partner stop you from doing other things or …

Going to School 1,730 Miles From Home

By: Rose Mannas Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, The University of San Francisco I think that most people who end up going to school far away fall into two separate camps: escape from their parents or coincidental. I fall into the second category, and you might, too. But if you are looking to escape your parents, going to school over 1,700 miles isn’t a bad option. Let me show you some of my thoughts right off of my pros and cons list: Pros: •Being stranded can kind of be a fun experience. •Some people think you have an accent which you swear you do not. •If you know you want to live in your hometown when you get a real job, why not try something different for once. •If your parents are financially supporting you, it may be fun to try somewhere completely out of your bubble. •Your experience is so unique to your friends that you always have lots to talk and laugh about. •You are forever entertained by the strange things you find different in the place you go to school at (did you know my Californian friends don’t have Waffle House?). Cons: • Travel is expensive- you may …

Making High-Stakes Low

By: Marisa Borreggine Campus Sherpa Blog Contributor, University of Washington Moving from high school to college can feel like a really big deal. You know more, you feel like you’ve got to work harder on assignments and tests, and it always seems to feel like the big words “YOUR FUTURE” are hanging above everything academic you do in bright neon lights. This amount of stress and pressure can build up and make you feel incapable of doing what you need to do to succeed in your classes. Here I present some ways to make those big deals feel a little bit smaller and more doable. Write it by hand first. When I have a big essay or abstract to write, the one thing that calms me down is writing the whole thing out on paper beforehand. You feel like you’re allowed to make more mistakes, and you can always just scratch out what you don’t like with pen and write over it. You can mess up the paper all you want and think as you go. When you have it all written out, you have to read through it as you type it up and you can fix whatever sounds wrong! …

4 Times in College When You Could Really Use Some Perspective

By: Marisa Borreggine Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, University of Washington When you fail. Everyone. Repeat that word aloud. E V E R Y O N E. Has failed a test, a paper, missed an assignment, taken that blow. Think about your high school valedictorian (and if that’s you, think of the salutatorian). Imagine them sitting in their dorm, looking at the big fat F they just received. I can almost guarantee you that they have been there. Now think about the faith you and your school put in that person—you don’t worry about them. You won’t be surprised when you see them at the high school reunion and they’ve got it all figured out. Guess what? They got an F once, too! And they lived. You will too. Perspective. When you are too tired to go out. There’s this weird feeling throughout college, or at least your freshman year, that every time you go out it’s going to be the best night of your life. Maybe it’s all the pop songs telling us to stay up all night, drink until we’re perfect, live our dreams, but this sentiment stays with me going into my third year of college. I’m not …

Three Things You’re Bound to Feel as a College Student

By: Marisa Borreggine Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, University of Washington FOMO Even if you’ve never heard the acronym, you’ll definitely know the feeling. It stands for “Fear of Missing Out”. For whatever reason, college seems to be the peak time for this feeling. You come into freshman year excited to make new friends and have ‘the best time of your life’, but ultimately it doesn’t pan out that way. You will have amazing memories and make great friends, but you’ll also have to spend late nights studying, hanging out in your dorm, not going out, etc. These nights are just as important—they’re why you’re at college in the first place! All your friends might be going out to a party, all excited to get dressed up and dance around, but if you have a midterm and know you have to crunch the numbers, it can be really disheartening to stay in while they post pictures of what a great time they had. In all honesty though, you’ll have tons of other nights like they did before you graduate! Sometimes, even they will look at photos of you hiking, partying, going out to dinner and feel FOMO as well. That’s part …

Thoughts on Party Alternatives

By: Marisa Borreggine Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, University of Washington If you’re anything like me, sometimes you need a break from going out and partying every weekend. Not necessarily because you need more time to do homework, because let’s face it: we all need a break come Friday night. I’m raising the question, who’s to say that just because we’re in college that break has to be getting all dressed up, taking an uber ten blocks, and standing in a stranger’s home for three hours with a bunch of strangers who don’t want to introduce themselves? Who’s to say you have to wake up feeling like someone punched you in the head every Saturday? Who’s to say that is the best way to spend your free time? Not I. Here I’ll present some of my favorite alternatives to partying on the weekend that I hope you and your friends will give a chance. Climbing Depending on where you live, there could be some really cool climbing gyms teeming with fun open late on the weekend! It’s a great way to relieve some stress after a long school week, and afterwards you can go out to dinner with Seattle Bouldering Project …

The 10 Do’s And Don’ts Of The Post College Acceptance Phase (as seen on Buzzfeed)

By: Sherpa Marisa Borreggine Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, University of Washington 1. DO: Celebrate! MTV / Via mtv.tumblr.com Post all those pictures of your campus, of you and your mom crying over your acceptance letter, of your massive collection of college sweatshirts. You’ve earned it! 2. DON’T: Ask your peers for the list of places they did and didn’t get into. Giphy / Via giphy.com As you probably know, this is a stressful time for everyone! Sometimes your friends don’t get into their dream school, and that’s the last thing they want to talk about. Keep it light and congratulate everyone on wherever they decide to go! 3. DO: Get A Summer Job! Girls on HBO / Via giphy.com Oh, trust me, you’re gonna need the extra cash. College is the time for late-night Thai food, clothes for the weather you didn’t expect (yeah, I’m talking about you Michigan), and little odds and ends like dorm decorations, books, concerts. Do yourself a favor! 4. DON’T: Give in to “Senioritis.” Yeah, your dreams have been achieved, all you’ve been working for has paid off, but at the risk of sounding like your parents: Keep going! You can get that acceptance taken …

My College Admissions Story: Cornell University

By: Sherpa Alyssa Holman Blog Contributor, Cornell University  A Tear-Filled Journey I knew I wanted to go to Cornell University, so when it came time to apply to colleges, I sent in my Early Decision application to Cornell and waited tirelessly for a response. Finally, the day came when Cornell released their admittance. All of this was amidst my finals week; therefore, I was stressed and anxious. Cornell’s online portal opened at 2:00 PM PST, 15 minutes before my AP Latin Final. I paced anxiously until 1:50 PM. When I couldn’t take it any longer, I logged into the portal and kept clicking refresh. These ten minutes felt like a century. Finally, exactly at 2:00 PM, I accessed the portal and began to cry. My friends saw and started to comfort me, saying “It’s ok” and “You didn’t get in?” and “Don’t worry.” I couldn’t even speak enough to tell them I was accepted. I pulled them in and showed them my computer, and they started to cry with me. We sat there for a few minutes, all so surprised and happy at the news. I called my mom, and she started crying too. All throughout my Latin final, I couldn’t concentrate. The news of the acceptance had overwhelmed and …