Tips for Acceptance and Rejection Season

    Written by: Bryn Doyle (University of Southern California) As a college freshman who applied to 19 schools, I am very familiar with the pains and joys that come with rejections and acceptances. Here are my 5 tips for college responses:   Celebrate every acceptance. These months will be filled with rejection, so it is important to savor every acceptance. Even if you get into what you consider a “safety school,” that is something to celebrate. You are going somewhere and every acceptance broadens your choices. Let it hurt Rejection sucks. It is that simple. Let it hurt and be sad. You are saying goodbye to an entire future you imagined, and that is a big deal. But, Rejection Doesn’t Mean Your Life is Over There are plenty of paths for school after High School. As long as you approach your education with an open mind and enthusiasm, it will work out. Don’t be strict with your path. Maybe another school suits you better than your supposed dream school or community college will help you transfer to your dream school. Keep an Open Mind Even if you get into that school from your list with the lowest acceptance rate and most …

Joining the Trojan Family

Contributed by: Bryn Doyle, University of Southern California Whether you’re into spirit at your high school, spirit at University of Southern California (USC) is unavoidable. During freshman orientation and move in, freshmen are totally immersed in the school’s pride. The fight song is heard from every corner of campus and “fight on” victory signs are flashed at the new students. Rallies begin, and students gather at the heart of campus at the statue of Tommy Trojan. I must admit, I participated ironically at first like many other freshmen. Now, we all fully embrace the cheesy spirit on campus because it is one of things that makes USC great. Football games are wildly fun, even if you don’t like football or sports like me. Learning the songs and cheering on Traveler, a real horse, as he runs around stadium after a Trojan Touchdown is so lively and exhilarating. Together, united by our love for our school, the Trojan Family is born and grows with every freshman class. Perhaps the greatest part of the Trojan Family is the growing network it has in Los Angeles and the world. The school provides an extensive Trojan Network website to help current students make connections and find …

Time Management: Adjusting to the Free Time in A College Schedule

    Written by Sherpa Jackie G. In high school, you typically are in class from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Even if you have a study hall period, you are required to stay in a certain area of campus or be back within an hour or so. College does away with this standard schedule all together. Classes are held sometimes as late at 7 p.m., or you may have an 8 a.m. class and not another until 4 p.m. What you do during that time is not dictated by anyone but yourself. How you choose to spend that time can have a great influence on your grades, social life, and overall health. Do you spend that time at the gym? Getting ahead on assignments? Fooling around on YouTube for hours? I remember my first day of college classes, or I should really say class. Monday rolled around and I had one lecture from 1 to 1:50 p.m. and the rest of the day to spend however I wanted. While many students at UC Santa Barbara succumb to hours on the beach playing Frisbee, tanning, or surfing, I tried to incorporate a balance of work and play. I may spend …

Co-Op Schools

By: Joseph Urbano Campus Sherpa Blog Contributor, RIT Some schools are known for their architecture. Others are known for their academic rigor. Athletics are at the heart of others. I go to the Rochester Institute of Technology, or RIT, which is best known for its co-op program. Co-op schools include Northeastern, RIT, and Drexel, but certainly aren’t limited to those. Even if a university isn’t a “co-op university,” co-op is something you could pursue. So let’s talk about it. As a student at RIT, I am quite familiar with how we go about our co-op program, but not so much about every other school. so you should still do your research! You shouldn’t assume all the details are going to be the same from school to school. Every school is different. What is a co-op, anyway? Co-op stands for cooperative education, or, in other words, a paid internship. RIT requires all students in the College of Engineering and most students (depending on major) in the College of Computing and Information Sciences to spend 50 weeks of full time (40+ hour/week) employment in order to obtain a Bachelor’s degree, broken up into 3 blocks. Depending on the major, schedules may be …

Featured Post: Tips for College Essays by Admitsee

It’s easy to be intimidated by college acceptance rates these days, especially with Ivy League universities like Brown. So how exactly do you stand out to admission officers for a chance to be one of the lucky 9%? AdmitSee has a database of successful college application files. Each files not only includes essays, but also background, test scores, extracurriculars and advice. If you are applying to Brown, here are 5 essay excerpts to help you with your essay: Elle2020, Class of 2020 “Are you a member of the Amish Mafia?” A classmate once asked after I told her I was Mennonite. “Do you not use electricity?” Another student quickly speculated. “No,” I sighed.   In this instance, as is commonplace, my disclosure was met with looks of puzzlement, and then a response along the lines of, “but you don’t seem like the rest of them.”   Throughout my life, I have heard the whole gamut of possible retorts to the statement of my religion. ACal212, Class of 2019 I have a complex Oedipus complex: it’s quite difficult (impossible, really) to develop and then resolve a rivalry with my father if he does not exist. So, according to Freud, I’ll never …

College Feature: Touring the University of San Francisco

By: Rose Mannas Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, University of San Francisco Do you ever look back at photos of yourself, and think about different things were when you were in the picture? The photo above was taken in May 2013 when I was a mere 17 year old trying to make a college choice. I am pretty sure that shirt ended up in a charity donation bin and those sunglasses fell in the lake years ago. Save that ‘Freshman <3’ photo album on Facebook, no matter how embarrassing the photos inside of it are (don’t worry, you can set it on private if you no long want your aunt seeing you on a very awkward welcome weekend trip). I am from Texas, which is needless to say not close at all at USF. I had only been to San Francisco once in my life. Pretty much all I remembered was getting a dorky hat from In-and- Out (oh so ‘Californian’) and going to Ghirardelli Square. Obviously this was before college was on my mind. When I told my parents I want to check out a school in California, they were obviously surprised. Coming from a hardcore Longhorn family, was I …

College Feature: How to Tell If You Can Live at NYU: A Touring Guide

By: Samantha Baugh Campus Sherpa Blog Contributor, NYU  Most college tours are pretty straight-forward, even the self guided ones. You want to check out the dorms, the dining halls, the facilities of your intended area of study. If you have extra time it is always good to look at the main social areas: quad, student center, and library. The same is true for New York University. However, like our unofficial motto says, we are “in and of the city.” To tell if you really like the NYU campus vibe, you have to like the New York City vibe. Of course, no one has time to tour the entire city, let alone just Manhattan. However, the Greenwich Village area is a great place to start. I would suggest looking for restaurants with cheap menus and good food in your area. Also, look out for spots that hold your favorite types of environments I personally spent the majority of my first semester looking for the ideal movie theatre. It is now my favorite place to get away from the non-stop feeling of the city. By the end of the first month you will have a favorite off-campus study spot or relaxation destination. …

College Interview Tips for Success

By: Alexandra Rimoldi  Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, Georgetown University  Perhaps one of the most dreaded parts of the already emotionally draining and time consuming college application process is the interview. With an increasingly competitive pool of applicants, more and more colleges are wanting interviews to further distinguish one from the many in order to create the most perfect, dynamic, and diverse freshman class yet. Still there is no magic piece of information that anyone can give to ensure a student’s admission. However, going to Georgetown (a school where people seem to be obsessed with interviews) and trudging through the college application process has let me into a few tips that cannot hurt to know when going into the interview. Dress smart, but don’t overdo it A college interview isn’t the same as a job interview. It’s a little more casual, but still extremely important. First impressions and the way a person looks (for better or for worse) play a big part in how an interviewer may see you. Stay away from jeans, but a full suit isn’t necessary – you’re still a student. Guys: any nice looking pair of pants that is not jeans should be fine. Wear a button up …

Thoughts on Party Alternatives

By: Marisa Borreggine Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, University of Washington If you’re anything like me, sometimes you need a break from going out and partying every weekend. Not necessarily because you need more time to do homework, because let’s face it: we all need a break come Friday night. I’m raising the question, who’s to say that just because we’re in college that break has to be getting all dressed up, taking an uber ten blocks, and standing in a stranger’s home for three hours with a bunch of strangers who don’t want to introduce themselves? Who’s to say you have to wake up feeling like someone punched you in the head every Saturday? Who’s to say that is the best way to spend your free time? Not I. Here I’ll present some of my favorite alternatives to partying on the weekend that I hope you and your friends will give a chance. Climbing Depending on where you live, there could be some really cool climbing gyms teeming with fun open late on the weekend! It’s a great way to relieve some stress after a long school week, and afterwards you can go out to dinner with Seattle Bouldering Project …

Meet the Sherpas: Roy Shadmon, UCSC

A Message from Sherpa Roy: My name is Roy and I’m a second year computer science student at UC Santa Cruz. I’m the President of Mishelanu (The Israeli-American Club), an event planning intern at Santa Cruz Hillel, and a brother of Alpha Epsilon Pi Fraternity. Most of my time that I’m not spending studying or on these extracurricular activities, you’ll be able to find me playing basketball, Fifa, or just hanging out with my friends. I like being a Sherpa because I enjoy showing off my beautiful campus to potential students. I also really like to hike around campus.

The 10 Do’s And Don’ts Of The Post College Acceptance Phase (as seen on Buzzfeed)

By: Sherpa Marisa Borreggine Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, University of Washington 1. DO: Celebrate! MTV / Via mtv.tumblr.com Post all those pictures of your campus, of you and your mom crying over your acceptance letter, of your massive collection of college sweatshirts. You’ve earned it! 2. DON’T: Ask your peers for the list of places they did and didn’t get into. Giphy / Via giphy.com As you probably know, this is a stressful time for everyone! Sometimes your friends don’t get into their dream school, and that’s the last thing they want to talk about. Keep it light and congratulate everyone on wherever they decide to go! 3. DO: Get A Summer Job! Girls on HBO / Via giphy.com Oh, trust me, you’re gonna need the extra cash. College is the time for late-night Thai food, clothes for the weather you didn’t expect (yeah, I’m talking about you Michigan), and little odds and ends like dorm decorations, books, concerts. Do yourself a favor! 4. DON’T: Give in to “Senioritis.” Yeah, your dreams have been achieved, all you’ve been working for has paid off, but at the risk of sounding like your parents: Keep going! You can get that acceptance taken …

On the woes of Freshman Year: Choosing Classes

By: Sherpa Marisa Borreggine Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, University of Washington  If there is one feeling I remember going into my freshman year of college, it is confusion. It’s one of those rites of passage that you don’t even get a pat on the back for, or really any reward for, but you still feel like you’re being hazed as you try to navigate every new set of responsibilities thrown upon you. What’s the day-to-day like of living in a dorm? How do I eat? What’s the meal plan going to be like? How do I pay for anything? And, of course, the reason you’re even going through all of this trouble—what are my classes going to be like? Since it’s 2016 and the internet is a thing, most every school you go to will have an online course catalog available. Now, here is where you decide if this is going to be stressful, fun, or a little bit of both. I personally strive under fun stress, so Step One for me was to find the college I’d most likely end up in. I don’t mean your university, I mean the college within your school, such as College of Arts …

My College Admissions Story: Cornell University

By: Sherpa Alyssa Holman Blog Contributor, Cornell University  A Tear-Filled Journey I knew I wanted to go to Cornell University, so when it came time to apply to colleges, I sent in my Early Decision application to Cornell and waited tirelessly for a response. Finally, the day came when Cornell released their admittance. All of this was amidst my finals week; therefore, I was stressed and anxious. Cornell’s online portal opened at 2:00 PM PST, 15 minutes before my AP Latin Final. I paced anxiously until 1:50 PM. When I couldn’t take it any longer, I logged into the portal and kept clicking refresh. These ten minutes felt like a century. Finally, exactly at 2:00 PM, I accessed the portal and began to cry. My friends saw and started to comfort me, saying “It’s ok” and “You didn’t get in?” and “Don’t worry.” I couldn’t even speak enough to tell them I was accepted. I pulled them in and showed them my computer, and they started to cry with me. We sat there for a few minutes, all so surprised and happy at the news. I called my mom, and she started crying too. All throughout my Latin final, I couldn’t concentrate. The news of the acceptance had overwhelmed and …

Overheards: Butler University

By: Sherpa Savannah, Butler University All business majors create their own student business their sophomore year! It was a great way to get hands-on professional experience. Plus, you get to keep all profits you make!

What’s something people don’t know about your school? – Harvard University

“Every year in the spring, there is a day called Housing Day, which is essentially a school wide holiday. On this day, freshman are delivered their housing assignment (which of the 12 upperclassmen houses they will live in for the next three years). Upperclassmen from your house rush into your room to hand you the letter and celebrate your assignment. Then, you get oriented to your new house and community during the rest of the day and at night!” – Sherpa Josh, Harvard University