Dorm Tour: The University of San Francisco

Contributed by: Rose Mannas Curious what it’s like to live at Stanford? Check out this video for a brief tour of a real Stanford dorm brought to you by a current undergraduate student! Dorm Life at USF: All freshmen must live on campus unless they are within a certain milage of campus. With housing is the mandatory purchase of a meal plan (one meal plan, expect athletes can get a bigger one). There are dorms on campus: Hayes Healy: Alternating sex floor. Single, double, and triple rooms. Also living learning communities Gilson: Same as Hayes Phelan: Mixed sex floors, gender inclusive floor (can have opposite sex roommates), and living-learning communities Fromm: All girls Lone Mountain: Same as Hayes Loyola Village: 21+ housing or junior class standing only, apartment style living Interested in more? Check out Campus Sherpa’s Youtube channel for more dorm videos of various universities throughout the country! 

Dorm Tour: Columbia University

Contributed by: Sairaj Sajjath Curious what it’s like to live at Stanford? Check out this video for a brief tour of a real Stanford dorm brought to you by a current undergraduate student! Dorm Life at Columbia: On-campus housing is not mandatory except for first-years, although it is preferred for many students due to proximity to campus compared to apartments. First-years commuting from parents’/guardians’; residences are not required to take on-campus housing. Most floors are coed, although there are single-sex floors available for first years. I have not heard of/cannot find anything about single-sex floors for other years. Students can choose to live in doubles, singles, or in suites, although larger suites are generally reserved for upperclassmen. Some Greek organizations/other special organizations are given brownstones by Columbia; students in these organizations can also choose to live in their brownstone. Housing is guaranteed to all students for up to four years – however, students are not guaranteed their residence of choice. Dorms are assigned on a lottery system (students are assigned a number; those with lower numbers choose residences earlier than students with higher numbers). Interested in more? Check out Campus Sherpa’s Youtube channel for more dorm videos of various universities throughout the country! 

Not Home for the Holidays

By: Rose Mannas Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, The University of San Francisco All families have holiday traditions that they just can’t see themselves missing, whatever their culture is. For my family, one of these things include pulling all of the Christmas decorations down from the attic. We play Christmas music throughout the house and take a few hours working all together to transform the house into Christmas-mode. But when I got home from my Fall semester my Freshman year, the house was already transformed, and I was left to just enjoy the tradition without participating. You will find that once you leave for college, you are going to miss key happenings in your family that you hate to see go on without your presence. Unfortunately, it is inevitable and includes things that you did not even know you cared about. If your family cannot afford to get you home on every holiday, it can be so painful to sit at school, sometimes alone. Where I go to school, the majority of students are from the Bay Area, making it so easy for them to get a ride home or pay $10 to use public transportation to get to their home …

Cheap(er) Theater in NYC

By: Samantha Baugh Campus Sherpa Blog Contributor, New York University If you are like me, you love going to see shows. Now, Broadway is probably your first thought but it can often be very difficult to find affordable seats to go see a show. If you are on a tighter budget, there are plenty of other exciting and affordable opportunities to see innovative and professional theatre. Location wise, East Village is a great place to look. The Kraine Theatre hosts play festivals throughout the year. They also have regular companies use their space. For example, New York Neo-Futurists hold a weekly show that is only ten dollars. The New York Theatre Wing is more expensive but they turn out a lot of incredible shows that sometimes even make the jump to Broadway. You have the chance to see some future Tony Award winning shows/actors/writers before they make their jump. The key is to keep an eye out for pop up productions around the cities. Often enough, a show will rent out spaces, sometimes even homes, to perform their work. I once went to an immersive production where I walked around the home as a play was going on. Comedy shows …

Dorm Tour: Stanford University

Contributed by: Alexandra Bourdillon Curious what it’s like to live at Stanford? Check out this video for a brief tour of a real Stanford dorm brought to you by a current undergraduate student! Dorm Life at Stanford:  Housing is mandatory for freshman, but pretty normal for students to live on campus all 4 years because it is quite affordable compared to neighboring areas. There are a number of Greek and non-Greek “Row” Houses which are popular because of the strong sense of community, well-received dining options (each house has a special chef!) and location to all campus parties. These are popular for upperclassmen housing. Some (few) dorms have single sex floors. Single sex dorms are usually Greek related, but there is one exception – a smaller female-only Row House. Freshman year, housing is randomly assigned or based off of input from the “Draw form.” The other 3 years require a lottery draw system that allows students to form draw groups with close friends and rank housing. Stanford uses a tier system so that each year you are allowed to use your “Tier 1, 2 or 3” (Tier 1 being the best!). Interested in more? Check out Campus Sherpa’s Youtube channel for more …

One for One

By: Joseph Luongo Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, Harvard University My college admissions and acceptance process was pretty unique than many other students. I looked at a lot of what people would call “Elite” schools throughout my college touring process. This included the Ivy League, Stanford, Duke, MIT, Georgetown, and so on and so forth. Now this may be a little biased since I’m from Massachusetts, but the second I stepped onto Harvard’s campus it felt like home and I knew that’s where I wanted to be for a number of reasons, but that’s another story. I liked a lot of schools, narrowing my top five down to Harvard, Duke, Dartmouth, Brown, and Princeton, in that order. But Harvard was my number one by far and I wanted to attend there more than anything. I decided to apply for Restrictive Early Action at Harvard which means you can only apply early to Harvard for a private school, but are allowed to apply to public schools as well. Since I’m from Massachusetts, this meant that I was able to apply to any of the University of Massachusetts schools or any other state schools as well. I started my application over the summer …

Co-Op Schools

By: Joseph Urbano Campus Sherpa Blog Contributor, RIT Some schools are known for their architecture. Others are known for their academic rigor. Athletics are at the heart of others. I go to the Rochester Institute of Technology, or RIT, which is best known for its co-op program. Co-op schools include Northeastern, RIT, and Drexel, but certainly aren’t limited to those. Even if a university isn’t a “co-op university,” co-op is something you could pursue. So let’s talk about it. As a student at RIT, I am quite familiar with how we go about our co-op program, but not so much about every other school. so you should still do your research! You shouldn’t assume all the details are going to be the same from school to school. Every school is different. What is a co-op, anyway? Co-op stands for cooperative education, or, in other words, a paid internship. RIT requires all students in the College of Engineering and most students (depending on major) in the College of Computing and Information Sciences to spend 50 weeks of full time (40+ hour/week) employment in order to obtain a Bachelor’s degree, broken up into 3 blocks. Depending on the major, schedules may be …

10 Mistakes You Don’t Need to Make Your Freshman Year (as seen on Buzzfeed)

By: Rose Mannas Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, The University of San Francisco Buying Textbooks Before Class Starts I get it. You want to be fully prepared for the first week of classes and not have to dread waiting hours in the bookstore line. I did this too, and dropped almost $300 on books I virtually never using. Don’t kid yourself— if you want it just for ‘reference’, you’re going to Google it before you lug down a textbook from the top of your closet. Adding Everyone on Facebook I know this feels like a good idea, but you need to think about the future. When you and that person make eye contact in the cafeteria, are you going to say something or just smile and look away? They get that odd feeling that you stalked their profile and now… here you are. How creepy is that? Overusing the Class Facebook Page One of my greatest pastimes as an upperclassman is scrolling through those painful posts before freshman year of those seeking to find a roommate. It is almost like reading a bad Craigslist dating ad. Serial commenters say, “Messaged!” and “I love X music, too!!”. Don’t be one of those …

Search for Off-Campus Housing

By: Samantha Baugh Campus Sherpa Blog Contributor, NYU It is not secret that New York City is expensive. That is probably one of the first associations people have with the place. This can make finding your own place difficult. Some people elect to stay in student housing throughout their time at NYU to save money. This is a completely valid option and not uncommon. NYU’s student housing has a variety of options so finding a university apartment space is extremely easy. You won’t be stuck sharking a room forever if you don’t want to. However, many wish to live out of student housing. But, most of these people have to go to another borough of New York to find affordable places. The most common borough is Brooklyn. Brooklyn is fun and very refreshing once you spend a lot of time in Manhattan. It is slightly more spacious and residential compared to Manhattan’s skyscraper style. There will be plenty of other NYU students taking the subway to campus with you from Brooklyn. Students also live in Queens and the Bronx or even across the Hudson in Jersey. What is strange and amazing about the city is how close everything really is, …

A Recruiting Trip Gone Wrong

By: Joseph Luongo Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, Harvard University This is a story of one of my recruiting trips to one of my top schools during the college process and it got a bit awkward, to say the least. To protect the privacy of the school and the people involved, I will use different names. I will refer to the school I was visiting as “Wallace University”. I will also refer to my parents’ colleges as “Windsor College” for my mom, and “Sunnydale” for my dad. These are all fictional colleges from my favorite TV shows and movies (bonus points if you know where they’re from). Since I was getting recruited to play varsity sports at the Division I level, I went through a slightly different application and searching process than someone who is not a college athlete. All sports are different, but essentially college coaches are always on the lookout for early high school talent and standouts. Their recruiting process is nonstop. As soon as they have athletes who are “committed” to their school and confirmed, they already begin finding athletes for the next year. I stood out very early in high school for my sport. Coaches were contacting …

Family Visits

By: Rose Mannas Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, The University of San Francisco One of the most exciting parts about going to school relatively far away is having you family come visit you. It truly does give you something to count down to! My parents come to San Francisco about once an academic year, and my sister has come twice in my three years there (once for a job interview, but still). I really look forward to each time they visit. It doesn’t matter if you are a freshman or a senior- your family come to see you at school is really a treat and a great break from your usual grind. Your parents might be interested in different things than you might think. My parents really wanted to see more of my every day life. What are the dorms like? The communal restrooms? Are the cafeteria lines really long during the school day? What are the classrooms like that you take your lesson in? When my parents came, I was much more focused on showing the city. They of course wanted to see San Francisco, but think of it this way. If you were paying thousands of dollars for someone …

Dorm Tour (VIDEO): Brown University

Contributed by: Alex Volpicello, Brown University As a part of our dorm tour series, we’re compiling videos from our Sherpas at schools across the nation! Here’s what your dorm at Brown University could look like: Dorm Life at Brown: There is a mandatory housing requirement at Brown for your first two years, after which you are eligible to apply for off-campus permissions, but only actually likely to have them granted your senior year. Freshmen housing at Brown is almost exclusively doubles, but there are some singles and the occasional triple. You do fill out a housing questionnaire to get paired with a roommate, in which you can opt into a gender-neutral dorm room, single-sex (male or female) floors, substance-free floors, and quiet floors. Roommate pairings also consider smoking habits, studying habits, noise habits, and sleeping habits, in addition to avoiding pairing based on same first name or same home state (if USA). Campus Sherpa is starting a dorm tour series so that you can see what it would actually be like to live at different schools. Our Sherpas are sharing videos of what their dorm rooms, apartments, or houses look like. You can check out more on our Youtube Channel. 

Entering College in a Long Distance Relationship: Dos and Don’ts

By: Joe Urbano Campus Sherpa Blog Contributor, RIT In my last post, we discussed one of the many factors in choosing the best school for you: relationships. In this post, we’re moving past the decision making process and moving into the nitty-gritty. A decision has been made, and now the two of you are going to live with it: the transition to a long distance relationship. The above paragraph makes the prospect of entering a long distance relationship sound really gloomy, but in reality, it isn’t. By no means is it an easy decision or an easy lifestyle, but it isn’t the end of the world, I promise. You’re now off to school for the first time, and there are some things you should do, and there are some that you shouldn’t. Here are a few tips to make both your college experience and your relationship the best they can be as you begin the next part of your life: Don’t: Over Communicate. You and your partner are going to talk, text, and use Snapchat. This is obviously expected and it is good! But you shouldn’t let the familiar comfort of your partner stop you from doing other things or …

The School Spirit Starter Pack: College Apparel and Accessories You MUST Buy

By: Alex Cole Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, William and Mary University Once November rolls around, relatives and family friends all inevitably begin asking the same question: what do you want for Christmas/Hanukkah/other winter holidays? Luckily, for those who get in early decision or early action, or just have a good feeling that you’re going to be accepted by your dream school, the holidays are the perfect time to start amassing college apparel. But what items will you actually use? Here, I’ve outlined the spirit paraphernalia every college student needs. If you haven’t decided on a school yet, be sure to save this list to guide you on a celebratory shopping spree when your final decision is reached. A Baseball Cap Baseball caps are perfect for throwing on for your Friday morning 8 am class once you get to school; before then, though, a baseball cap is a great way to casually rep your school while running errands, going for hikes, or sightseeing on summer trips. Bonus points for picking out a classy embroidered hat that features the school crest! Tervis tumbler or water bottle If you’re a coffee drinker, a Tervis Tumblers are a great invest because they can be …

Featured Post: Tips for College Essays by Admitsee

It’s easy to be intimidated by college acceptance rates these days, especially with Ivy League universities like Brown. So how exactly do you stand out to admission officers for a chance to be one of the lucky 9%? AdmitSee has a database of successful college application files. Each files not only includes essays, but also background, test scores, extracurriculars and advice. If you are applying to Brown, here are 5 essay excerpts to help you with your essay: Elle2020, Class of 2020 “Are you a member of the Amish Mafia?” A classmate once asked after I told her I was Mennonite. “Do you not use electricity?” Another student quickly speculated. “No,” I sighed.   In this instance, as is commonplace, my disclosure was met with looks of puzzlement, and then a response along the lines of, “but you don’t seem like the rest of them.”   Throughout my life, I have heard the whole gamut of possible retorts to the statement of my religion. ACal212, Class of 2019 I have a complex Oedipus complex: it’s quite difficult (impossible, really) to develop and then resolve a rivalry with my father if he does not exist. So, according to Freud, I’ll never …