Going to School 1,730 Miles From Home

By: Rose Mannas Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, The University of San Francisco I think that most people who end up going to school far away fall into two separate camps: escape from their parents or coincidental. I fall into the second category, and you might, too. But if you are looking to escape your parents, going to school over 1,700 miles isn’t a bad option. Let me show you some of my thoughts right off of my pros and cons list: Pros: •Being stranded can kind of be a fun experience. •Some people think you have an accent which you swear you do not. •If you know you want to live in your hometown when you get a real job, why not try something different for once. •If your parents are financially supporting you, it may be fun to try somewhere completely out of your bubble. •Your experience is so unique to your friends that you always have lots to talk and laugh about. •You are forever entertained by the strange things you find different in the place you go to school at (did you know my Californian friends don’t have Waffle House?). Cons: • Travel is expensive- you may …

Stressing out about College Applications? Read This Now

By: Aishwarya Sadh Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, American University The due dates are approaching but you still don’t know what you’re going to study or where you want to go? Even if you are set on your potential school, still keep your options open. Here are some of the questions to help narrow down your options or at least alleviate some anxieties: A. What do you want to study? If you know what you want to potentially major in then awesome. Check to see which one of your schools has the best program for that field or major or has the major available. But what if I don’t know my major? It’s completely ok!! Take out a notebook. List your favorite classes in high school. List some topics that you’re interested in. These lists should give you a glimpse of potential fields or majors you would be interested in. Then look to see if your top schools have those majors available. Keep in mind that most state colleges would have array of majors. B. Where do you want to study? City/large school: Pro: fun activities available regularly, tons of people Con: too loud, too many people, lack of personal space Small …

Dorm Communal Bathrooms

By: Rose Mannas Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, University of San Francisco  I know what you are thinking: Communal restrooms in my dorm are going to be utterly repulsive, but I just have to survive one year and never have to deal with gross bathrooms again. Though this could be true for some, everyone has a different experience when it comes to having communal bathrooms. Let’s talk about the good and the bad: The Good  You never have to front money for toilet paper and cleaning products for the restroom. Budgeting in another $10 in cleaning supplies could pose a threat to your bagel commerce in the near future. Always available! Usually, dorm restrooms have many toilets and showers to be used by your floor mates. Never have I ever needed to wait to use the toilet, shower, or sink. It can be fun! It is a huge space to get ready for events with your floor friends. The counters span the entire space, perfect for spreading out makeup and hair tools. It a basically a giant pre-party for big on-campus events like concerts and mixers. The Bad Cleanliness. We all have different standards. For a clean freak like me, seeing …

College Feature: William and Mary’s Newest Program of Study – Native Studies Minor

By: Alex Cole Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, College of William and Mary The recent debate over the potential Dakota Access Pipeline and its relation to the Standing Rock Indian Reservation, the marginalization of Native Americans has gained increased attention. The escalating situation has made the College of William & Mary’s newest program of study even more timely; as of the Spring 2017 semester, William and Mary will offer a minor in Native Studies which can be pursued in conjunction with any major at the College. Founded in 1693, William and Mary has a long and sometimes turbulent history of relations with Natives. Most notably, the Indian School operated at the College operated from the year of the school’s founding until the funding ran out at the onset of the American revolution. The school occupied the Brafferton building on Ancient Campus, which still exists today, and required Native boys to live at the College where they received lessons in Christianity amongst other subjects. Although some Natives went on to use their knowledge of English to protect their tribes from British manipulation, other boys attended the school against their will and many died from exposure to European disease. Today, the Native Studies …

Being the Black Sheep

By: Rose Mannas Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, The University of San Francisco Do you notice anything different about me in the picture (far left). Maybe its that I, along with the charming older man in the row in front of me, are not wearing burnt orange. This photo was taken when I was home for Thanksgiving my freshman year. We drove from Dallas, where I am from, to Austin to go to a UT football game. My sister, my mom, and my dad are all Longhorns. Both of my parents graduated in 1990 and my sister is in the Class of 2017. Needless to say, I come from a very proud Longhorn family. But I am not a Longhorn. I always knew knew that I was not going to be a student at UT. I could never see myself on the campus, and the twice-a-month trip to Austin to football and basketball games really took its toll on my interest in the school. I have nothing against UT, but I felt as if I have almost already gone there. I knew all the great hang out spots, all the drama, fraternity and sorority top houses, best tailgate locations, and the …

College Feature: Touring the University of San Francisco

By: Rose Mannas Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, University of San Francisco Do you ever look back at photos of yourself, and think about different things were when you were in the picture? The photo above was taken in May 2013 when I was a mere 17 year old trying to make a college choice. I am pretty sure that shirt ended up in a charity donation bin and those sunglasses fell in the lake years ago. Save that ‘Freshman <3’ photo album on Facebook, no matter how embarrassing the photos inside of it are (don’t worry, you can set it on private if you no long want your aunt seeing you on a very awkward welcome weekend trip). I am from Texas, which is needless to say not close at all at USF. I had only been to San Francisco once in my life. Pretty much all I remembered was getting a dorky hat from In-and- Out (oh so ‘Californian’) and going to Ghirardelli Square. Obviously this was before college was on my mind. When I told my parents I want to check out a school in California, they were obviously surprised. Coming from a hardcore Longhorn family, was I …

Making High-Stakes Low

By: Marisa Borreggine Campus Sherpa Blog Contributor, University of Washington Moving from high school to college can feel like a really big deal. You know more, you feel like you’ve got to work harder on assignments and tests, and it always seems to feel like the big words “YOUR FUTURE” are hanging above everything academic you do in bright neon lights. This amount of stress and pressure can build up and make you feel incapable of doing what you need to do to succeed in your classes. Here I present some ways to make those big deals feel a little bit smaller and more doable. Write it by hand first. When I have a big essay or abstract to write, the one thing that calms me down is writing the whole thing out on paper beforehand. You feel like you’re allowed to make more mistakes, and you can always just scratch out what you don’t like with pen and write over it. You can mess up the paper all you want and think as you go. When you have it all written out, you have to read through it as you type it up and you can fix whatever sounds wrong! …

College Feature: How to Tell If You Can Live at NYU: A Touring Guide

By: Samantha Baugh Campus Sherpa Blog Contributor, NYU  Most college tours are pretty straight-forward, even the self guided ones. You want to check out the dorms, the dining halls, the facilities of your intended area of study. If you have extra time it is always good to look at the main social areas: quad, student center, and library. The same is true for New York University. However, like our unofficial motto says, we are “in and of the city.” To tell if you really like the NYU campus vibe, you have to like the New York City vibe. Of course, no one has time to tour the entire city, let alone just Manhattan. However, the Greenwich Village area is a great place to start. I would suggest looking for restaurants with cheap menus and good food in your area. Also, look out for spots that hold your favorite types of environments I personally spent the majority of my first semester looking for the ideal movie theatre. It is now my favorite place to get away from the non-stop feeling of the city. By the end of the first month you will have a favorite off-campus study spot or relaxation destination. …

College Interview Tips for Success

By: Alexandra Rimoldi  Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, Georgetown University  Perhaps one of the most dreaded parts of the already emotionally draining and time consuming college application process is the interview. With an increasingly competitive pool of applicants, more and more colleges are wanting interviews to further distinguish one from the many in order to create the most perfect, dynamic, and diverse freshman class yet. Still there is no magic piece of information that anyone can give to ensure a student’s admission. However, going to Georgetown (a school where people seem to be obsessed with interviews) and trudging through the college application process has let me into a few tips that cannot hurt to know when going into the interview. Dress smart, but don’t overdo it A college interview isn’t the same as a job interview. It’s a little more casual, but still extremely important. First impressions and the way a person looks (for better or for worse) play a big part in how an interviewer may see you. Stay away from jeans, but a full suit isn’t necessary – you’re still a student. Guys: any nice looking pair of pants that is not jeans should be fine. Wear a button up …

Big Fish, Big Pond

By: Maeve Healy  Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, Georgetown University  Most of us were class presidents in high school. You can walk into a room on campus at any given time and find a handful of former student government leaders, and sitting next to them will be three or four who had a direct hand in influencing some sort of local legislation involving social justice. Half the room is made up of team captains and athletic stars, and then over in the corner you have students that traveled all the way around the world and back in high school. They were all valedictorians, they all have extensive community service backgrounds and they were all the presidents of 6,000 clubs during their senior year. Some have attributed this to the classic mantra “big fish, little pond.” At Georgetown, it is a sea of “big fish.” We all share the same drive for excellence, that’s what brought us here. And it is so easy to get here as a freshman and convince yourself that you are no longer a big fish – you might think you’re a minnow, or maybe one of krill fish in Finding Nemo. It’s so easy to think that now, …

What To Write Your Personal Statement On

By: Samantha Baugh Campus Sherpa Blog Contributor, New York University  It seems like every year that writing a “good” personal statement falls under narrower and narrower categories. You aren’t supposed to write about a struggle that is too cliché, you aren’t supposed to write about something too typical, you aren’t supposed to showboat your accomplishments. However on the other side you are somehow supposed to write about your greatest intellectual achievement but make it spiritual and unique without it sounding like a Lifetime movie. The truth is writing your personal statement, a good one, is much easier than it seems. Okay, maybe in retrospect now that I’m in university it seems like that. I think I may have gone through a handful of ideas before I figured out what and more importantly how I was going to write on. The hot tip for a personal statement is simple: write about something you actual care about. If you genuinely care about the impressive non-profit you started, absolutely do it. If you genuinely care about how playing football changed your life, absolutely do it. If you genuinely care about cooking hot dogs on Sundays, absolutely do it. The trick with personal statements …

4 Times in College When You Could Really Use Some Perspective

By: Marisa Borreggine Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, University of Washington When you fail. Everyone. Repeat that word aloud. E V E R Y O N E. Has failed a test, a paper, missed an assignment, taken that blow. Think about your high school valedictorian (and if that’s you, think of the salutatorian). Imagine them sitting in their dorm, looking at the big fat F they just received. I can almost guarantee you that they have been there. Now think about the faith you and your school put in that person—you don’t worry about them. You won’t be surprised when you see them at the high school reunion and they’ve got it all figured out. Guess what? They got an F once, too! And they lived. You will too. Perspective. When you are too tired to go out. There’s this weird feeling throughout college, or at least your freshman year, that every time you go out it’s going to be the best night of your life. Maybe it’s all the pop songs telling us to stay up all night, drink until we’re perfect, live our dreams, but this sentiment stays with me going into my third year of college. I’m not …

The Do’s and Dont’s of New Cities

By: Marisa Borreggine Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, University of Washington If you’ve just begun college, or transferred to a new school from a previous university or community college, you are all too familiar with the confusion and wonder that comes with moving to a new city. The feelings that meet you aren’t exactly the same as they were in your childhood, moving to a new town and immediately making friends just because you were the same age. It takes a bit more effort to make this new town home, and to make those friends all over again. DO: Introduce yourself! Chances are, everyone at the bar/party/event you’re at is just as nervous about meeting people as you are. It does help to have a classic ice breaker (my favorite is asking if someone was in my [insert most interesting class I’ve taken] class, and when they weren’t just talk about that class!), but sometimes just saying “Hi!” is all it takes! Don’t: Introduce yourself to everyone… One of the more unfortunate parts of being in a new town is the idea that not every stranger is trustworthy, even at the local bar. Make sure to be aware of who you’re …

Three Things You’re Bound to Feel as a College Student

By: Marisa Borreggine Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, University of Washington FOMO Even if you’ve never heard the acronym, you’ll definitely know the feeling. It stands for “Fear of Missing Out”. For whatever reason, college seems to be the peak time for this feeling. You come into freshman year excited to make new friends and have ‘the best time of your life’, but ultimately it doesn’t pan out that way. You will have amazing memories and make great friends, but you’ll also have to spend late nights studying, hanging out in your dorm, not going out, etc. These nights are just as important—they’re why you’re at college in the first place! All your friends might be going out to a party, all excited to get dressed up and dance around, but if you have a midterm and know you have to crunch the numbers, it can be really disheartening to stay in while they post pictures of what a great time they had. In all honesty though, you’ll have tons of other nights like they did before you graduate! Sometimes, even they will look at photos of you hiking, partying, going out to dinner and feel FOMO as well. That’s part …

The Job Gradient

By: Marisa Borreggine Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, University of Washington I’m sorry to break the news, but it turns out college isn’t just studying and partying—it’s also reaching out and looking for a job. It’s all fine and well to spend your first few months at school getting your bearings, but soon you will find out that you’re going to need money. Even if your parents have to resources to send you a little something, getting a job is a great idea. It helps you organize your time, learn responsibility, and how to take action. Your parents will be pretty happy about it too! The extra money will help when you have to start paying rent if you move out of the dorms, and supplement your self-care buys, whatever they may be (clothes, chocolate, new sports gear, etc). There’s a process, from my experience, to the college job thing. You might start as early as the summer before college working a small hometown mom-and- pop-shop, which does give you a leg up, but a lot of people don’t get their first job until college, so don’t feel alone if that’s you! The best place to start, in my opinion, is …