5 Ways to Make your Day-to- Day Schedule Less Painful

By: Marisa Borreggine Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, University of Washington Set aside a Syllabus Day At the beginning of every quarter, I sit down with each syllabus for my new classes and schedule like no one ever has. Take it one syllabus at a time and check out the schedule the teacher has laid out and write down your homework (reading assignments, due dates, test dates) for every day of that quarter. That way you don’t have to think about that assignment or fear missing a deadline until the day you’ve scheduled yourself to think about it! It lifts a great weight off your shoulders and makes you feel so much more prepared for the class you’re walking into Addendum to Syllabus Day Whilst putting together the aforementioned beautiful syllabus that will make your life 1000x easier, remember that assigned homework is not the only thing you need to stay on top of! I put test dates in a big highlighted box for each class, then backtrack two to three weeks in my agenda and write ‘make a study schedule.’ It’s hard to predict what kind of studying you’ll need to do for a class early on, or even for …

What To Write Your Personal Statement On

By: Samantha Baugh Campus Sherpa Blog Contributor, New York University  It seems like every year that writing a “good” personal statement falls under narrower and narrower categories. You aren’t supposed to write about a struggle that is too cliché, you aren’t supposed to write about something too typical, you aren’t supposed to showboat your accomplishments. However on the other side you are somehow supposed to write about your greatest intellectual achievement but make it spiritual and unique without it sounding like a Lifetime movie. The truth is writing your personal statement, a good one, is much easier than it seems. Okay, maybe in retrospect now that I’m in university it seems like that. I think I may have gone through a handful of ideas before I figured out what and more importantly how I was going to write on. The hot tip for a personal statement is simple: write about something you actual care about. If you genuinely care about the impressive non-profit you started, absolutely do it. If you genuinely care about how playing football changed your life, absolutely do it. If you genuinely care about cooking hot dogs on Sundays, absolutely do it. The trick with personal statements …

The Do’s and Dont’s of New Cities

By: Marisa Borreggine Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, University of Washington If you’ve just begun college, or transferred to a new school from a previous university or community college, you are all too familiar with the confusion and wonder that comes with moving to a new city. The feelings that meet you aren’t exactly the same as they were in your childhood, moving to a new town and immediately making friends just because you were the same age. It takes a bit more effort to make this new town home, and to make those friends all over again. DO: Introduce yourself! Chances are, everyone at the bar/party/event you’re at is just as nervous about meeting people as you are. It does help to have a classic ice breaker (my favorite is asking if someone was in my [insert most interesting class I’ve taken] class, and when they weren’t just talk about that class!), but sometimes just saying “Hi!” is all it takes! Don’t: Introduce yourself to everyone… One of the more unfortunate parts of being in a new town is the idea that not every stranger is trustworthy, even at the local bar. Make sure to be aware of who you’re …

Three Things You’re Bound to Feel as a College Student

By: Marisa Borreggine Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, University of Washington FOMO Even if you’ve never heard the acronym, you’ll definitely know the feeling. It stands for “Fear of Missing Out”. For whatever reason, college seems to be the peak time for this feeling. You come into freshman year excited to make new friends and have ‘the best time of your life’, but ultimately it doesn’t pan out that way. You will have amazing memories and make great friends, but you’ll also have to spend late nights studying, hanging out in your dorm, not going out, etc. These nights are just as important—they’re why you’re at college in the first place! All your friends might be going out to a party, all excited to get dressed up and dance around, but if you have a midterm and know you have to crunch the numbers, it can be really disheartening to stay in while they post pictures of what a great time they had. In all honesty though, you’ll have tons of other nights like they did before you graduate! Sometimes, even they will look at photos of you hiking, partying, going out to dinner and feel FOMO as well. That’s part …

The Job Gradient

By: Marisa Borreggine Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, University of Washington I’m sorry to break the news, but it turns out college isn’t just studying and partying—it’s also reaching out and looking for a job. It’s all fine and well to spend your first few months at school getting your bearings, but soon you will find out that you’re going to need money. Even if your parents have to resources to send you a little something, getting a job is a great idea. It helps you organize your time, learn responsibility, and how to take action. Your parents will be pretty happy about it too! The extra money will help when you have to start paying rent if you move out of the dorms, and supplement your self-care buys, whatever they may be (clothes, chocolate, new sports gear, etc). There’s a process, from my experience, to the college job thing. You might start as early as the summer before college working a small hometown mom-and- pop-shop, which does give you a leg up, but a lot of people don’t get their first job until college, so don’t feel alone if that’s you! The best place to start, in my opinion, is …

Thoughts on Party Alternatives

By: Marisa Borreggine Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, University of Washington If you’re anything like me, sometimes you need a break from going out and partying every weekend. Not necessarily because you need more time to do homework, because let’s face it: we all need a break come Friday night. I’m raising the question, who’s to say that just because we’re in college that break has to be getting all dressed up, taking an uber ten blocks, and standing in a stranger’s home for three hours with a bunch of strangers who don’t want to introduce themselves? Who’s to say you have to wake up feeling like someone punched you in the head every Saturday? Who’s to say that is the best way to spend your free time? Not I. Here I’ll present some of my favorite alternatives to partying on the weekend that I hope you and your friends will give a chance. Climbing Depending on where you live, there could be some really cool climbing gyms teeming with fun open late on the weekend! It’s a great way to relieve some stress after a long school week, and afterwards you can go out to dinner with Seattle Bouldering Project …

Meet the Sherpas: Roy Shadmon, UCSC

A Message from Sherpa Roy: My name is Roy and I’m a second year computer science student at UC Santa Cruz. I’m the President of Mishelanu (The Israeli-American Club), an event planning intern at Santa Cruz Hillel, and a brother of Alpha Epsilon Pi Fraternity. Most of my time that I’m not spending studying or on these extracurricular activities, you’ll be able to find me playing basketball, Fifa, or just hanging out with my friends. I like being a Sherpa because I enjoy showing off my beautiful campus to potential students. I also really like to hike around campus.

On the woes of Freshman Year: Choosing Classes

By: Sherpa Marisa Borreggine Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, University of Washington  If there is one feeling I remember going into my freshman year of college, it is confusion. It’s one of those rites of passage that you don’t even get a pat on the back for, or really any reward for, but you still feel like you’re being hazed as you try to navigate every new set of responsibilities thrown upon you. What’s the day-to-day like of living in a dorm? How do I eat? What’s the meal plan going to be like? How do I pay for anything? And, of course, the reason you’re even going through all of this trouble—what are my classes going to be like? Since it’s 2016 and the internet is a thing, most every school you go to will have an online course catalog available. Now, here is where you decide if this is going to be stressful, fun, or a little bit of both. I personally strive under fun stress, so Step One for me was to find the college I’d most likely end up in. I don’t mean your university, I mean the college within your school, such as College of Arts …

Out on the Town: Coffee Shops at the University of Washington

By: Sherpa Marisa Borreggine Campus Sherpa Staff Writer, University of Washington  1. Suzzallo Café: The Essential UW Café             Located in Red Square, Suz is the café you sit in for that awkward hour break in between classes your freshman year, because likely they’re all in the large auditorium hall, Kane, which is right next door. Like all the other UW cafés, they “proudly serve Starbucks”, along with pre-made salads, sandwiches, wraps, juices, etc. They also sell scantrons if you’re in a pinch, or if you’re prepared and want to buy 30 for the rest of your college career. Tip for this café: take some advice from a  Suz barista veteran, NO, we do not have pencils. 2. Parnassus Café: Underground, Literally. Parnassus is the unique café situated in the basement of the Art Building on the far end of the UW Quad. There’s always cool art, some cool people, and better food. There’s terrible service since it’s in the basement, but it’s pretty nice to sit in and just work on homework or read with no distractions, plus the music is always great. Tip for this café: always look at the posters on the billboards outside …

What’s something people don’t know about your school? – Harvard University

“Every year in the spring, there is a day called Housing Day, which is essentially a school wide holiday. On this day, freshman are delivered their housing assignment (which of the 12 upperclassmen houses they will live in for the next three years). Upperclassmen from your house rush into your room to hand you the letter and celebrate your assignment. Then, you get oriented to your new house and community during the rest of the day and at night!” – Sherpa Josh, Harvard University