Harvard Housing Memories: Kirkland House

By: Joe Luongo, Harvard University Campus Sherpa Blog Contributor As I mentioned, Harvard has twelve upperclassmen houses that students live in their last three years at Harvard. A building that holds a special meaning to me is my house, Kirkland House. In Kirkland House, I had three very special experiences that makes me feel that Kirkland is especially unique. Earlier in the year, Hillary Clinton visited Harvard, in particular the Kirkland House Junior Common Room, for a small talk and interview completely unannounced and without press. I was lucky enough to meet and speak with her which still has me in disbelief. Out of all the universities in the world, and all the places and Houses at Harvard, Hillary visited Kirkland. The second experience, which happened rather recently, involved a certain billionaire, who founded a certain social media platform who just so happened to visit Kirkland as well. Mark Zuckerberg, inventor of Facebook, was a student in Kirkland Room H-33 before he dropped out to develop and expand his creation. Two of my roommates got assigned H-33 for housing this summer, and lucky for me, I decided to visit them on the same day and exact time that Mark came …

Upperclassmen Life at Harvard

By: Joseph Luongo Campus Sherpa Blog Contributor, Harvard University In my previous blog, I wrote about freshman life at Harvard. I would like to continue that storyline with talking about upperclassmen life. As previously mentioned, all freshmen are required to live in Harvard Yard with randomly assigned roommates. The next three years are very different. Although students are not required to live on campus for the next three years, 98% choose to do so. Finding out your living arrangement after freshman year is actually a very long and exciting process at Harvard. Much like other facets of Harvard, housing is much like Harry Potter. Students are randomly sorted into one of the twelve upperclassmen houses located throughout the University (minus the sorting hat). The first step to this process is setting up a “blocking group”. This is a group of one to eight students of their choosing who will all be guaranteed to be placed in the same house with each other. This can include anyone within your graduating year of any gender; Harvard has gender neutral housing, even within actual rooms. Most of the time, students choose to live with people in their blocking group, but depending on which …

Search for Off-Campus Housing

By: Samantha Baugh Campus Sherpa Blog Contributor, NYU It is not secret that New York City is expensive. That is probably one of the first associations people have with the place. This can make finding your own place difficult. Some people elect to stay in student housing throughout their time at NYU to save money. This is a completely valid option and not uncommon. NYU’s student housing has a variety of options so finding a university apartment space is extremely easy. You won’t be stuck sharking a room forever if you don’t want to. However, many wish to live out of student housing. But, most of these people have to go to another borough of New York to find affordable places. The most common borough is Brooklyn. Brooklyn is fun and very refreshing once you spend a lot of time in Manhattan. It is slightly more spacious and residential compared to Manhattan’s skyscraper style. There will be plenty of other NYU students taking the subway to campus with you from Brooklyn. Students also live in Queens and the Bronx or even across the Hudson in Jersey. What is strange and amazing about the city is how close everything really is, …